Alaskan Adventure: Uncovering the Best Disc Golf Courses in Alaska 

If you want to play some of the best disc golf courses in Alaska, prepare for a run-in with the regional wildlife, even a bear or two, from time to time. In a state where seeing a moose in the local shopping center is commonplace, you can imagine what disc golf entails. 

Fortunately, out of all fifty states, Alaska is the most beautiful. It’s both primal and ethereal, like transporting yourself back in time to enjoy a modern-day sport. Alaska is enormous, though there are only 52 courses throughout the largest state in the US. 

For that reason alone, the state is ranked 45th among the 50 states as the best for disc golf. It’s not because Alaska isn’t a great place to play but because it’s difficult to travel from place to place, especially for out-of-state residents visiting for the first time. 

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses in Alaska

Alaska is far bigger than it looks on a map. For instance, it takes the same amount of time to fly from Anchorage to Seattle as it does to fly from New York to South Florida. There aren’t many roads there, and many places are only accessible via plane flight or boat. 

While it’s fantastic in the sense that Alaska is a well-preserved state, in terms of its natural beauty, it’s not conducive to hundreds of disc golf courses. On the bright side, that makes my job a whole lot easier. The fewer there are to sift through, the easier it is to find the gems. 

And, no matter what you think of the state’s ranking, there are definitely some gems in Alaska. Many of these courses take full advantage of the robust and ancient topography of Alaska. 

  1. Kincaid Park, Anchorage (Best Overall)
  2. Birch Hill – Fairbanks (Runner-Up)
  3. Aant’iyeik Park Disc Golf Course (Most Challenging)

These are my top three, for reasons I will disclose in more detail below. I had to include Aant’iyeik because I’m diabolical, and there’s no way I can allow myself to pass up the opportunity to include what many consider the most difficult (or a very close second place) disc golf course in the world

Before we get started, I will say this—the courses that make our list of the best of the best aren’t randomly chosen based on starred reviews. As an experienced disc golf player, I identify what makes a course viable, mostly insofar as the strategy of design is incorporated into the course. 

It has to make sense, challenge newcomers and veterans alike, be well-maintained, and still be a blast to play. Amenities on site always help as well. So, without further ado, here is our list of the best disc golf courses in Alaska and why they made the list. 

Kincaid Park, Anchorage

Features

  • 5,330’ to 7,583’ course length
  • Pro and amateur tees
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Heavy woods
  • Cart friendly
  • Restrooms on site

It makes sense that the best course in the state of Alaska is located in one of the state’s major cities. This course has a ton of variety, giving it a unique feel each and every time you play it. While there is water around the course, it’s never close enough to be deemed a hazard on any of the 18 fairways. 

There are plenty of elevation changes on many of the fairways, but it never feels cheap. Speaking of cheap, you won’t find any of that in the heavily wooded areas either. All of the lines are tough but fair. There are a few low ceilings, especially from hole #6, and if your disc ends up off the fairway, the road back is often difficult. 

Birch Hill – Fairbanks (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 5,585’ to 5,609’ course length
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Chainstar baskets
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Half and half open and wooded
  • Dirt tees
  • 18 holes
  • Located on a ski trail

Depending on who you talk to, Birch Hill is either extremely tough or one of the more moderate courses. There are dirt tees rather than concrete or turf; however, with a decent pair of sneakers or hiking shoes, there’s plenty of grip. Though the elevation changes will have you reaching deep into your bag, the front nine is almost entirely open. 

In fact, bring your ultra-high-speed drivers for the front nine. The back nine dives deep into the woods and requires more technical shots and carefully molded throws. Players report a lot of wildlife on the course as well, including moose and bears, so prepare accordingly. Overall, the course is a beautiful one, though the mosquitoes get pretty bad in the summer.

Aant’iyeik Park Disc Golf Course – Juneau (Most Challenging)

Features

  • 3,241’ to 5,002’ course length
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Mach II baskets
  • Nearby camping
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Heavily wooded
  • Mixed tee pads
  • 18 holes

Aant’iyeik Park Disc Golf Course isn’t challenging because it’s poorly designed—it’s challenging because it takes the typical terrain in Alaska and amps it up to the next level. It’s quite a feat to create a soul-breakingly difficult course that’s fair and relatively short. There are amateur baskets, but it doesn’t make much difference. This course mandates precision, and lack thereof is punishing. 

Cedars and Douglas-Firs will slap your discs down a lot. The course is heavily wooded, and you’ll find that much of the difficulty comes into play when you’re trying to mold a line through a dogleg while also dealing with elevation and low overhead. If your disc goes off the fairway, it’s a nightmare to retrieve. Hiking shoes are an absolute must for this course. 

Peters Creek – Chugiak

Features

  • Heavily wooded course
  • 18 holes
  • A single water hazard
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Mach V baskets
  • 4,300’ course length
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Restrooms on site
  • Cart friendly

While it’s not on the same level as Aant’iyeik Park, Peters Creek is still a difficult course, and there are no amateur tee pads this time around. The elevation changes here are moderate to non-existent, but, like many courses in Alaska, it’s very heavily wooded. You’ll find yourself fighting doglegs, molding tight, precision throws, and playing a very technical game. 

The most brutal holes are the straight ones simply because you have no leeway for a hard fade to the right or the left. If you end up in the trees, it’s a fight to get back out. Fortunately, the fairways are fair and well-thought-out. A creek runs with the course, but it only becomes an issue to be aware of late in the game. 

Westchester Lagoon Park – Anchorage

Features

  • 2,154’ to 4,550’ course length
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • 18-hole and a 9-hole course
  • Single pin locations
  • Perfect beginner’s course
  • Light woods
  • Relatively flat terrain

Westchester is a popular local disc golf course, and it made the list because it’s a well-designed course that caters to beginners in the sport. After the brutally complicated and challenging courses above, Westchester is a breather. The course is fairly short, even if you start from the pro tees, and the woods are not heavy by any means.

It’s not a flat course, but the elevation changes are only moderate at worst and won’t do much to affect your gameplay. The most interesting part about this course is that it’s only open in the winter. That’s right. If you want to learn how to play disc golf in Alaska, Westchester is the best place to go, but only if you can brave the elements.

North Peninsula Rec. Nikiski – Kenai

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Heavy woods throughout
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Clear and helpful signage
  • Rolling hills

By the time I’m done, I hope I will have thoroughly established a specific theme—do your best to avoid going off the fairways in any course in Alaska, but especially North Peninsula Rec. The fairways are clean-cut and well-maintained, as is the entire course. But the rough is, well, the rough you would expect of uninterrupted nature in Alaska.

It’s very easy to lose your disc, and this is a tough little course. It includes tight lines, narrow straightaways, and moderate elevation changes throughout. Some holes are more forgiving, mostly where the forest thins, and you have a little more room for error. While the course is fair, a requisite in my reviews, there are still plenty of trees and grass here, ready to slap down your plastic. 

Kenai Eagle DGC – Kenai

Features

  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Gravel tee pads
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • 18 holes
  • 54 par
  • Beginner-friendly
  • Very short course

Kenai Eagle DGC is a prime example of the perfect disc golf course for all skill-level players. There’s not a single par 4 or par 5 on the course, and it’s one of the best disc golf courses in Alaska for practicing drives with a putter. In fact, you can use a putter to successfully play all 18 holes at Kenai. Elevation changes are there, but they’re subtle and don’t interfere. 

The trees are not brutally heavy, but landing a disc in the rough has consequences, some of which can seriously cost you. As with most courses that are small and built with a compact style in mind, some of Kenai’s holes and baskets are very close together. At times, someone finishing up a non-successive or prior basket will be right next to you. 

Seven Pastures DGC – Skagway

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 5,560’ course length
  • 54 par
  • Tone baskets
  • Dirt tees
  • Single pin locations
  • Single basket locations
  • Cart friendly
  • Heavily wooded

Last but not least, we have the Seven Pastures DGC in Skagway, Alaska. Though it’s located in a fairly mountainous area, the course itself is pretty flat. It’s certainly a unique course, with each hole marker containing a beer keg with a spray-painted number. It’s a fairly simple course, and it’s a beginner disc golf player’s dream course for prepping for more difficult alternatives. 

Though it’s heavily wooded, the fairways are plenty wide enough, and the rough is not difficult to escape. The views are definitely a highlight, as the surrounding area is quintessential Alaska. A lot of players that hit up this disc golf course are disembarking from the cruise liner that makes port nearby, so you’re liable to run into people from all over the country when you play.

Final Putt – Best Disc Golf Courses in Alaska

Playing any one of the courses on our list of best disc golf courses in Alaska is the closest you’re likely to come to wildlife in the extreme. Alaska, unlike most states, is still mostly wild and untamed territory, with the passage and leavings of humanity more of an exception rather than the rule. 

The good news is you’ll experience some of the most beautiful and fascinating countryside in the United States. Of course, that’s always been one of the major advantages disc golfers enjoy. The bad news is a bear might eat your disc. 

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