Arizona’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Unveiling the Finest Courses for Disc Enthusiasts

Some of the best disc golf courses in Arizona are truly unique. Where states like Oregon or Alabama include the typical topography you come to expect at a disc golf course—trees, hilly areas, underbrush, and open fields—Arizona is wildly different.

I’m not saying Arizona is unique just to pull in readers and make Google algorithms happy. Arizona is the only state with four different and unique desert types. That makes for some exciting and terrifically unique disc golf course designs. 

That’s not to say Arizona doesn’t have forested courses. It wouldn’t truly be disc golf without a tree or two to slap down your near-perfect drive. Arizona is ranked 26th in the US, with 124 courses. While it’s not the biggest state for the sport, it’s certainly one of the most uniquely beautiful. 

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses in Arizona

There are a few sites out there that talk about the “best courses” in [insert state here], but they’re traditional listicles with virtually no explanation as to the “how” of the decision-making process. I don’t roll like that. As an experienced player, I understand the immense frustration of having your disc slapped out of the air by an errant tree. 

I even name some of the trees that have, over the years, become my arch-enemies. There’s a difference between thoughtful, challenging, strategic, and fun-focused disc golf course designs and those that put a tree in the fairway because the local designer thought it would be funny. 

I base my choices on experience with a variety of course designs, from heavily wooded to wide open and everything in between. But, most importantly, does the course challenge you and improve your game? Is it fun to play? Is it hard but fair? While asking those questions, I came up with a top three.

  1. Wilderness Ranch DGC – Lakeside (Best Overall)
  2. Watson Lake – Prescott (Runner-Up)
  3. Red Mountain Park DGC – North (Most Challenging)

Of the eight courses on the list, these three really stand out, especially for those of you looking for a highly technical, challenging course like Red Mountain Park – North. The remaining five are fantastic courses in their own right, but just couldn’t quite match the top three. 

Best Disc Golf Courses in Arizona

The topography in Arizona helps it stand out compared to other disc golf courses in the US, and it’s interesting to see how course designers carved out these unique course designs. Some are hard, some are beginner-friendly, but most fall somewhere in between, with something to offer disc golfers at every level. 

Wilderness Ranch DGC – Lakeside (Best Overall)

Features

  • 5,507’ to 6,857’ course length
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Turf tee pads
  • Chainstar Pro baskets
  • Heavily wooded
  • Cart-friendly
  • Pay to play

Wilderness Ranch DGC is a private course in Lakeside, Arizona. You have to fork over $5 to get in, but it’s well worth the price of admission. For those who hate trees, this course is a heavily wooded one. However, it’s an example of how courses should be, with tight but fairly-drawn lines. 

Upkeep on the course is excellent, so you won’t have to fight your way out of undergrowth if you get off the fairway. There are pro and am tee pads, providing an alternative for beginners as well. Overall, it’s a gorgeous course, and most importantly, it’s very well maintained. Bring your technical game and leave the high-speed drivers at the house. 

Watson Lake – Prescott (Runner-Up)

Features

  • Lots of Rocky Outcrops
  • Rubber tee pads
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Mach V baskets
  • cart -friendly
  • Pay to play

If you’ve never visited a state like Arizona, this is the first example of the highly unique topography. It’s also a beautiful course with some incredible views throughout. The utilization of the desert terrain is phenomenal, and the course presents a number of challenges, despite the lack of trees and elevation changes. 

Gone are the days of expecting a disc to give you a good skip after the fade. The rocks can be particularly brutal on your discs, so you may not want to grip and rip without adding a bit of precision. Take a break at hole #5 and enjoy the terrific view. Just don’t forget your disc.

Red Mountain Park DGC – North – Mesa (Most Challenging)

Features

  • 6,265’ to 6,943’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DGA baskets
  • Cart friendly
  • Extreme challenge

Red Mountain includes two courses—north and South, with the North course featuring the most challenge. The first half of the course is mostly desert terrain, including cacti, boulders, and shrubs. However, it’s mostly open, providing you with an opportunity to break out the high-speed drivers.

However, when your disc goes low, it’s liable to come to a quick stop when it hits the undergrowth. The back half of the course is rife with cacti, trees, and far more underbrush. You’ll have to carve tight lines through the narrow tunnel fairways. You’ll learn to hate all manner of cactus plants, and the desert is brutal on disc plastic. 

Fountain Hills Park – Fountain Hills

Features

  • 5,784’ to 6,907’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x10 water hazards
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Single tee pad locations
  • Mach X baskets
  • Cart friendly

Fountain Hills is an iconic disc golf course in Fountain Hills, Arizona. The only reason it’s not in the top three, however, is the number of water holes. While not a bad thing by any means, a lot of beginners may walk away from the game after spending an afternoon losing most of their newly acquired discs. 

Outside of that, it’s well-designed, with fairways that require some thought and carefully molded shots. There aren’t many trees throughout the area, but each hole still makes you plot out your game plan. The water holes aren’t brutal, but they are certainly tricky. 

Cottonwood Riverfront Park – Prescott

Features

  • 5,160’ course length
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Mach III baskets
  • Cart friendly
  • 18 holes
  • Concrete and rubber tee pads

Named after the trees that permeate the entire course, Cottonwood Riverfront Park is one of the more beautiful courses on the list, featuring some natural eye candy at every turn. It’s also an excellent course for beginners looking to improve their game and intermediate players. 

The best part is that many of the holes offer multiple approaches, so you can stick with what works best for you or work on molding lines with different throws. There are several technical shots as well, which is especially challenging if you like to play recreationally while including OB and Mandos.

Vista Del Camino DGC – Scottsdale

Features

  • 5,650’ course length
  • x5 water holes
  • 18 holes
  • Chainstar baskets
  • Single tee pad locations
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Cart friendly

Every hole on this course requires an anhyzer or a hyzer, so you can easily conquer the course with a very small plastic selection. High-speed drivers need not apply. That’s not to say the course is enormously difficult. You just have to bring your thinking cap along for the ride. 

There are a number of technical holes as well, and somewhere between three and five pin locations on each hole. These aren’t often clearly marked, so you have to be sure you know where the basket is before you launch. Though there are five water hazards, two of them are simply backdrops.

Buffalo Ridge Park – Phoenix

Features

  • 6,068’ course length
  • Mach II baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • 27 holes
  • Restrooms on site
  • Mixed tee pad types

Buffalo Ridge is an interesting mix of beginner-friendly and more competitive holes throughout the course. It also has a side venue of sorts, where you can break off from the regular course and play a series of alternate holes for more of a challenge.

The trees aren’t heavy, but the hills are, so bring discs with plenty of glide to clear those peaks. The terrain is rough, but there’s little that can slap down your plastic. However, the elevation changes allow for some interesting blind holes.

Maricopa Meadows – Chandler

Features

  • x4 water holes
  • 27 holes
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • Mach III baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Private course
  • 7,436’ course length

Maricopa Meadows features three “over the water” holes, which often strike fear in the hearts of disc golfers. The course was recently redesigned to the delight of local disc golfers. It now features a challenging but not brutal layout with pro and amateur boxes on most holes. 

It’s sparsely wooded and provides disc golfers with opportunities to grip and rip those high-speed drivers. Many of the holes are simple and straightforward, but there are several that require some skill, molding a line for the best approach to the basket.

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Arizona

For those who have never been, the best disc golf courses in Arizona are highly unique and have an entirely different aesthetic. As a mostly desert state, it gets hot and dry, so bring plenty of water with you and stay hydrated. 

The courses on this list are stand-out courses in the state, and each one offers a learning experience, regardless of skill level. As long as you can tolerate the heat, you’ll experience the beautiful and startling colors of the desert, along with a fantastic disc golfing experience.

Find the best disc golf courses nearby, no matter where you are in the world!

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