The Best Disc Golf Courses In Australia: Frolf In The Great Southern Land

The best disc golf courses in Australia are all found on the coast, mainly the east coast. That’s not surprising since 85% of the population lives no farther than a few dozen kilometers from the ocean. 

The center of Australia isn’t unpopulated, just undeveloped, at least for the most part. 

Nevertheless, Australia is a top disc golf destination, ranking #10 or #11 in the disc golf world. That’s despite having only a shade over 100 courses, which means the best of the best are densely packed. 

My Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In Australia

It’s hard to dispel the illusion of Crocodile Dundee-type landscapes for Western audiences. Still, Australia’s topography is exceptional and every bit as vibrant and versatile as anything you’ll find to the north, west, or east of the island continent. 

For instance, standing on the tee box at Pine Rivers DGC feels no different than hole 18 at Pat Lunsford Blackwater DGC in Florida. 

These courses are simultaneously beautiful and challenging, especially for the casual disc golfer, walking in with a two-dimensional perspective. Besides, having such a high international ranking with so few courses is a claim to fame in and of itself. 

  1. Pine Lines – Gidgegannup, Australia (Best Overall)
  2. Meridian Downs – Little Mountain, Australia (Runner-Up)
  3. Weston Park DGC – Yarralumia, Australia (Best Challenge)

From the Pine wilderness of Gidgegannup to the brutal, howling winds of Yarralumia, these are the best disc golf courses in Australia. 

These and 5 more, including a DGC that’s right in the middle of a dormant volcano! Now, that’s something you definitely don’t see every day. 

While I love a good challenge, it would be just my luck for a dormant volcano to become active while I’m sitting on hole 9. 

Now that I’ve established the uniqueness of playing disc golf in Australia let’s unpack the top 8 and see what else the land down under has in store. 

Pine Lines – Gidgegannup, Australia (Best Overall)

Features

  • 6,600’ course length
  • High tree density
  • Mach V baskets
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • 18 holes
  • Private course
  • Turf tee pads

Pine Lines straddles the line between difficult and too difficult yet maintains a high level of popularity throughout the area surrounding Perth City. It’s even more popular in the winter. If you love carving tight lines through a heavily wooded course, this one is for you. 

Despite the tree coverage, the park still hosts 7 holes over 400’. With the exception of a handful, the remaining holes are all under 300’, and they’re the most difficult the course has to offer. 

The park itself is beautiful and moderately hilly, and it features a tightly packed gravel road that meanders like a river through the course. 

Meridian Downs – Little Mountain, Australia (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher Pro baskets
  • Low tree density
  • Mostly flat
  • Public park

Meridian Downs is a deceptively difficult disc golf park. It’s not up there with the next one on the list, but it has the ability to spring traps on you out of nowhere. It’s one of those parks where it looks as if the trees are sparse enough for a good shot right before you taco your disc into a tree you didn’t see. 

That’s not to say it’s unfair. Far from it. Meridian is an expertly designed course that will force you to learn its subtle nuances. If you want to be successful at Meridian Downs, it will take time and effort. 

This course is perfect for mildly overstable midranges and very overstable putters, allowing you to carve and finesse your way through one of the best disc golf courses in Australia. 

Weston Park DGC – Yarralumia, Australia (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 12,200’ course length
  • 27 holes
  • Grass tee pads
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • Moderate tree density
  • WG HD2 baskets

Weston Park DGC is a championship-level course in Yarralumia, Australia. It’s also a veritable nightmare on windy days, which constitutes 95% of any given time on the course. The respites from the wind are periodic, especially if you dive into the wood line for a hole or two. 

However, if you ever have the opportunity to play here, a careful choice of understable discs (tailwinds) and overstable discs (headwinds), and use nose-up and nose-down angles accordingly. 

The technical details of flight patterns and plastic molds really spring to life on courses like Weston Park. 

Crater Lakes Disc Golf Park – Mount Gambier, Australia

Features

  • 8,600’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • DISCatcher Pro baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • Moderate tree density

Sure, its last eruption was 7,700 years ago, and the area is nothing more than the collapsed remains of Mt. Mazama, but playing in a dormant volcano is nothing if not exhilarating—if not a tad bit unnerving. 

While the course layout says it features a standard and advanced course, it’s really just multiple tee pads for the same basket. 

The course is a winding tour of trees, underbrush, lush scenery, and moderately rolling hills. Some of the baskets are seated on man-made constructs of varying technique and aesthetics, such as stacked rocks or piers laid out in a side-by-side pattern. 

Unfortunately, that also means an approach that falls just short may end up being a disaster, thanks to a tendency to bounce and roll. 

Victoria Park – Ballarat, Australia

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Rubber tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

While not necessarily deemed a “championship-level” park, Victoria Park hosts its fair share of tournaments, mostly of the local variety. 

However, it also hosts a state-level tournament once per year. Much of the park sits on what looks like a golf course, with short-cropped, vibrant green grass. That grass will kill a disc’s momentum, however, so remember to keep your plastic up, even on your hardest drives. 

With a local suburb flanking the course, it meanders through and over lazy, rolling hills, with several open shots begging players to break out the high-speed drivers. 

There is a good mix of short and mid-range shots, making a disc golf range finder an essential item, with some holes barely over 100’ in length. Victoria Park is the perfect course for beginners. 

Pine Rivers DGC – Strathpine, Australia

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 7,200’ course length
  • ACE baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Mostly flatland

Not to be confused with Pine Lines, Pine Rivers DGC is situated in a large copse of pine trees, so you better be on your straight and narrow game if you don’t want to rearrange the molecular structure of your plastic. There are red tees and blue tees for amateur and veteran players, along with a well-designed, versatile layout.

The park is plenty challenging and hosts league days for local players throughout the week. The entire course isn’t all about finesse throws and lasers through the pine tree gaps, however. There are also some wide-open shots, so don’t forget your drivers at the house. 

Poimena Reserve DGC –  Austins Ferry, Australia

Features

  • 6,200’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Pro, intermediate, and amateur tee pads
  • Custom designed baskets
  • Gravel tee pads
  • Moderate tree density
  • Moderate elevation changes

Poimena Reserve DGC has recently undergone significant growth. Years ago, it was a nine-hole course situated in the middle of the suburb. 

Now, it’s an 18-hole course with echoes of championship-level play. This is especially true with the versatile design and three tees per hole.

For those who live near the course and play extensively, it’s a very effective training exercise. Thanks to the pro, intermediate, and amateur tee pads, skill level increases more gradually. 

It’s not a dense, heavily forested mess, but neither is it a wide-open high-speed driver fest. Poimena Reserve is a fantastic course because of everything in between. 

Mundaring DGC – Mundaring, Australia

Features

  • 5,400’ to 9,900’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Moderate tree density
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Rubber tee pads

Mundaring is the last of my best disc golf courses in Australia list and every bit deserving of a top eight mention. It features a healthy mix of wooded and open shots, with an additional up-and-down game for dealing with a very hilly environment. It’s a challenge but a fun one, nonetheless. 

It’s one of the oldest courses in Australia and a championship-level course that’s hosted the Aussie Opens and PDGA Majors. 

Though the course is challenging, most of the fun comes from a wide variety of shots, which means packing your disc golf bag with a little bit of everything. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Australia

The best disc golf courses in Australia are either on the west coast or the east coast, at least for the most part. 

Fortunately, the lack of real estate doesn’t equate to a poor outcome for the sport. Australia is one of the best countries in the world for the sport. Also, like just about everywhere else in the world, the game is growing rapidly in the Great Southern Land. 

Australia features a healthy mix of purely recreational, challenging, and championship-level courses for players of every type and mood. 

It’s far from the crocodile-infested outback that so often invades the Western hemisphere through movies and TV shows. 

If you love the game and are planning a trip to the Lucky Country, don’t worry–Australia has your disc golf game covered.

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