The Best Disc Golf Courses In Canada: Pursuing Plastic Perfection In The Great White North

The best disc golf courses in Canada are spread out over 3,855,103 square miles of real estate—larger than the United States. 

However, due to the seasonal weather extremes and low population densities, there are only 709 courses.

Despite that, Canada is one of the best countries in the world for disc golf, sitting at the number three spot. That statistic speaks volumes about the level of play in the Great White North! 

Canada is full of surprises, and I found a few worth sharing. 

My Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In Canada

Now, before I dive headlong into this, there is a fundamental difference between “most played” and “best”, a difference worth highlighting here. 

For instance, Baker Park in Calgary is consistently the most-played course in Canada. It was the first public course installed in Calgary, and it draws more players every year than any other course. 

At least, that’s true if you only go by UDisc check-ins via the app. Baker isn’t the best course; however, it certainly has its strengths. 

Population pockets throughout Canada certainly play their roles as well. I’m going with a more dynamic approach here. 

Hillcrest Farm Disc Golf Course—Bonshaw, PE, Canada (Best Course Overall)

Canmore Nordic Centre—Canmore, AB, Canada (Runner-Up)

Golf Island Disc Park—Pender Island, BC, Canada (Best Challenge)

The first two are easily championship-level courses, and they carry the label as well. 

Golf Island Disc Park is one of those hidden gems (for non-Canadian players, that is) that should be recognized for its versatility in course design and the myriad of skills you must bring to have a successful outing there. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses In Canada

If you think you can’t play disc golf in Canada during the winter months, don’t worry. While there are always courses that close down in the winter, there are many places you can still play in Canada, so long as you bring discs you are willing to lose! 

The point is you can enjoy most of the best courses in Canada all year long! 

Hillcrest Farm Disc Golf Course—Bonshaw, PE, Canada (Best Course Overall)

Features

  • 8,000’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x3 water hazards
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • High tree density
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Private course

John Houck is arguably one of the best disc golf course designers in the industry, and his talent shows at the Hillcrest Farm Disc Golf Course

This course is both challenging and fun for more casual players. However, it will rip you a new one if you don’t know how to land a disc on an incline or a decline.

Many of the DISCatcher baskets are positioned on extreme to moderate slopes, so bringing your disc in at a harsh angle is begging for trouble. 

You’ll find a handful of par 4s and even a couple of par 5s, along with plenty of diverse angles, lanes, ups and downs, and approaches. 

It’s a challenging course, though not the most challenging on the list, so bring your A-game!

Canmore Nordic Centre—Canmore, AB, Canada (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 6,600’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • DiscGolfPark Pro baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Tough terrain

Playing disc golf at the Canmore Nordic Centre is every bit the equal of taking a hike into the wild unknown. 

This park is absolutely stunning, and you’ll find yourself goggling at the surrounding scenery as much as playing disc golf. 

There are many trees throughout the course, but many of the fairways are very open and forgiving. 

The challenge mostly comes in the form of your up-and-down game, fighting the disconcerting aspects of throwing down and up major elevation changes. 

There’s never a point where you can legitimately think the course is unfair. 

It features a championship design, and each fairway is carefully crafted to balance challenge versus reward. 

Golf Island Disc Park—Pender Island, BC, Canada (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 4,300’ course length
  • 27 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • High tree density
  • Dirt tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads

Golf Island Disc Park is a rocky, tree-infested, highly technical course where the best players have many opportunities for ace runs, and newbies will struggle. 

There’s nothing wrong with the course design, but there are tight lanes to carve, along with a lot of rocks (which have the potential to really send your disc flying off course). 

It’s a small course, densely compacted, and a lot of fun to play. New players should definitely take their time before each throw. 

A late or early release will always introduce your disc to a tree. For those like myself, who like to throw low-flying slingshots through narrow lanes, those rocks will absolutely destroy you. 

Keep your disc up, and enjoy the challenge!

Raptors Knoll Disc Golf Park—Township of Langley, BC, Canada

Features

  • 5,500’ to 8,000’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

Raptors Knoll Disc Golf Park is your answer if you’re skimming through the best Canadian disc golf courses and looking for something without extreme elevation changes. 

While there are elevation changes throughout, they aren’t nearly as bad as some of the other parks on this list. That’s not to say Raptors Knoll isn’t difficult to play, however. 

The course features multiple layouts, allowing players to dig into the finer details of their skill levels and play preferences. 

Raptors is one of those parks that will take a beginner and turn them into a veteran. The incremental changes you can make each and every time you play the course is a fantastic strategy for improving your overall game. 

Aspen Meadows East—Sundre, AB, Canada

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Moderate tree density and elevation changes

I chose the East course because it’s a little more difficult than the West course. Of course, the fact that Aspen Meadows encompasses two courses is good news for all disc golf players. 

If you find the East course above your skill level, you can always switch to the easier West course until you’re ready. 

The tree coverage is pretty moderate, with some holes requiring precision and finesse and others allowing you a little more creative freedom with your drives and approaches. 

The tee pads are a bit mixed, but I actually prefer the dirt ones. They’re a bit of a pain the day after a rain, but some good hiking boots combo well, in terms of grip, on a dirt tee pad. 

Beech Hill Park—Sackville, NB, Canada

Features

  • 5,800’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Moderate elevation changes and tree density
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Mixed tee pad types

True to form, Beech Hill Park in New Brunswick is a sight to see. Of course, every disc golf park in Canada is a study in natural scenery perfection. 

There are only a couple of tough little doglegs here, but many holes play through trees. Fortunately, the tree coverage isn’t absolutely brutal, which is especially welcome news for amateur players just getting into the game. 

There are also some open holes for those who like to drag out the 14 and 15-speed discs and really put some mustard behind them. 

While there are some elevation changes, often enough to throw your game off a little (if you aren’t careful), it’s not as brutal as some of the other courses on this list. 

Hammonds Plains DGC—Hammonds Plains, NS, Canada

Features

  • 4.000’ to 4,300’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Moderate elevation changes and tree density
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations

The reason I listed the tree density as moderate is because the entire course is not covered in thick tree canopy. However, there are holes throughout the course where the trees become huge obstacles, forcing players into tight, well-defined lanes. 

On the flip side, you get plenty of open throws as well. Hammonds Plains DGC features a variety of terrain and obstacles, so it will be a refreshing course for many. 

You won’t find any overly lengthy holes here, but some will force you to take out more than a fairway driver out of your disc golf bag unless you’re one of those players who can create magic with a long-distance putter. 

You do have to play over a few roads, which means keeping an eye out for traffic. Roads are like urban play, offering a different set of tactics than you may be used to. 

Christie Lake Conservation Area—Dundas, ON, Canada

Features

  • 4,300’ to 5,500’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Rubber tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • High tree density
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Pay-to-play

Christie Lake Conservation Area offers one of the best challenges in Ontario, especially for new players or those looking to improve their skills. There are many tight fairways throughout, along with some moderate elevation changes and a high tree density.

Finesse and focus are everything while on this course, with tree tunnels being the primary difficulty. The good news is that when you reach the wide-open throws, it will feel like you’re being released. The tree density actually helps you prepare for a strong, straight drive when you’re finally out from underneath the tree canopy. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Canada

These are some of the best disc golf courses in Canada and they barely hold a candle to the riches the sport has to offer throughout the entire country. 

Canada is a beautiful place, even in the most remote locations, and the disc golf courses located there reflect that in every way. 

Whether you’re looking for a challenge or just enjoying casual play, Canada has plenty to offer everyone.

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