Connecticut’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Uncovering the Ultimate Fling!

Determining the best disc golf courses in Connecticut wasn’t too difficult, mainly because the state is so small. That’s the sole underlying factor behind the state’s poor ranking in the “top states for disc golf”—they’re 45th. 

While it’s easy to say, “There are only 53 courses in Connecticut,” the fact that you can drive through the state in less than an hour changes an otherwise poor outlook. Even if you took the long route and drove 60 mph, it would only take an hour and a half. 

With that information in hand, 53 courses are a bunch. The best part is, no matter where you live in Connecticut, there’s an excellent disc golf course within an hour’s drive! Unless you live well outside of Connecticut, the best course options below are just a little ways down the road. 

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses in Connecticut

Connecticut is home to the Taconic Mountain Range, along with both flat and hilly country. There’s a little bit for everybody here, and someone from Florida will feel at home on some courses while someone from the heart of the Smokeys will find plenty to appreciate as well. 

It gets cold in the winter, and if you enjoy playing in the snow, you’ll get more than an opportunity or two each year.  Many of Connecticut’s best courses are a part of the many parks across the state. Like the recreationally-focused parks around them, they are well-maintained within a highly enjoyable environment. 

  1. Bittner Park DGC (Best Course Overall)
  2. Dragonfly Disc Golf (Runner-Up)
  3. Rockwell Park (Best Challenge)

While there are more than just three parks on the list, the above represents the best that Connecticut has to offer. Even better, they simply stand out among other incredible courses. All of them present a challenge without sacrificing common sense, along with plenty of fun. 

Best Disc Golf Courses in Connecticut

One of the best features of all the disc golf courses in Connecticut is the scenery, especially in the fall. These courses are both a blast to play and are situated in beautiful spots throughout the Constitution State. Scenic doesn’t mean easy, however, so prepare yourself for a challenge, regardless of which course you hit up first. 

Bittner Park DGC – Guilford (Best Course Overall)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • x2 water hazards
  • 4,000’ to 6,000’ course length
  • Heavily wooded course
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Turf tees
  • DISCatcher baskets

Bittner Park is a beautiful course, though the number of trees you have to wade through from beginning to end may create a bit of disagreement. Fortunately, like any well-designed course, the fairway lines are fair and require a strategic approach to each. 

While elevation changes aren’t extreme, they do play a role throughout, and you’ll have to make a judgment call with plastic choice from time to time. With its short and long tee options, Bittner Park accomplishes that rare feat of creating a challenging environment for newbies and a big step up for veteran players.

Dragonfly DGC – Stonington (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 5,378’ course length
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Pavers tee pads
  • Prodigy baskets
  • A single water hazard
  • Restrooms on site

This course is a prime example of simplification without sacrificing challenge and fun. It’s not too heavily wooded, not too open. It doesn’t have major elevation changes or a horror fest of water hazards. In other words, it’s just right. Though the course is short, the design features a number of unique challenges.

For instance, the basket placement throughout is not always your typical basket stuck in the ground. There’s a water hazard on hole 13, but it’s only a very short water carry. There are technical shots and fairways that require precision and well-molded lines. You can’t rip your big drivers out here, but there is plenty of challenge to make up for it. 

Rockwell Park DGC – Bristol

Features

  • 18 holes
  • x4 water hazards
  • High level of challenge
  • 6,747’ course length
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Prodigy baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Extreme elevation changes

If you’re well into the advanced disc golfer stage and you’re looking for a challenge to push your game to the next level, Rockwell Park DGC is the answer. It’s a short but tough course, heavily wooded throughout, and featuring a number of challenging elevation changes. 

The elevation changes are well-integrated into each hole, forcing disc golfers to consider their glide while trying to throw a laser around a vicious dogleg left or right. There are several throws up steep slopes and throws down steep declines as well. Then there’s the presence of water on some of the holes, close enough to make you pay dearly for a mistake. 

Norbrook Farm Brewery – Colebrook

Features

  • 18 holes
  • A single water hazard
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Cart friendly 
  • Restrooms on site

Some disc golfers, native to Connecticut, make the argument that Norbrook Farm Brewery is the best disc golf course in Connecticut. It’s not hard to see why. It’s a beautiful slice of property, and the course itself is a blast to play. The course offers a solid mixture of wooded and open holes, and the elevation changes are moderate at best. 

It’s a tough little course too, especially since it’s a  single pin and single tee box set up. There isn’t an option to play the amateur tee. Hole #14 features a water hazard that’s more than capable of eating your disc. However, since it’s part of the Norbrook Farm Brewery, a beer to rinse the sorrow of a bad game away is right there on site. 

Park City Disc Golf Course – Bridgeport

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 4,600’ to 6,265’ course length
  • Chainstar baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • Rocky topography
  • Single pin locations
  • No water hazards

Given time, this park may challenge the top of the ranks. It’s fairly new, so we’ll have to see as time goes on. As it stands now, it’s a fantastic disc golf park with a variety of wooded shots and wide-open, high-speed driver opportunities. There is also a putting practice basket and a long-range basket, both of which are perfect for warming up before a game. 

Most of the wooded fairways require a decent degree of precision, with little room for error. It’s a great course for learning to mold your lines without mistakes burying you in a thicket of undergrowth. The park also features elevated baskets throughout for a bit of added challenge and overall aesthetic.

Page Park DGC – Bristol

Features

  • 18 holes
  • x5 water hazards
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • 5,640’ to 5,660’ course length
  • Single tee pad locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Extreme elevation changes

Page Park is mostly an in-the-woods affair, complicated by the extreme elevation changes throughout. Not only do you need your disc to hang aloft for longer or drop quickly, but you also need it to do so before it hits a perimeter of trees. The fairways are not too tight, but it will definitely teach you how to mold tight lines. 

There are five water hazards on the course, the worst of which is hole #12, which is a throwout over a lake. If you don’t make the far end, you’ll need some scuba gear. There are several excellent doglegs to the right, which will make right-hand forehand throwers and lefties very happy. Overall, it’s a beautiful course with the added elevation changes that can make or break a day. 

Wickham Park DGC – Manchester

Features

  • 6,177’ to 7,082’ course length
  • Chainstar baskets
  • Rubber tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Pay to play
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Restrooms on site
  • 18 holes

Entrance to Wickham Park DGC is worth every bit of the $7 price of admission. The course features a good mix of wooded holes and wide open spaces for you to let loose. Some of the elevation changes on certain holes are minor. However, some of them are insane and sudden as well. 

A couple of playthroughs on the course will get you past the surprise of those peaks and valleys, though. Alternate tees accommodate newbies and seasoned disc golfers, while multiple pin locations keep things fresh for each and every visit. 

Sherwood Island State Park – Westport

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Grass tee pads
  • Mach X baskets
  • Cart friendly
  • 7,147’ course length
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Restrooms on site

Last but not least, we have Sherwood Island State Park DGC. I had to throw an open course in here somewhere, and Sherwood not only fits the bill, but it’s also one of the best disc golf courses in Connecticut. Since it’s mostly open, be sure to bring your high-speed drivers along for the ride and enjoy the freedom to really wear out your arm. 

You also have Long Island sound in the background for an awesome aesthetic. Bring your swimsuit to play, and you can hit the water at the beach as soon as you’re done. Sherwood doesn’t have much in the way of wooded holes, but it still manages to incorporate some risk/reward on each hole. ‘

Final Putt – Best Disc Golf Courses in Connecticut

Who said you can’t have fantastic disc golf courses in one of America’s smallest states? Connecticut has more than its fair share, especially when you look at it from a per capita perspective. 
Plus, there are bound to be more courses on the way. With 53 packing the state already, there will soon be as many courses in Connecticut as there are Waffle Houses in Alabama. In the meantime, Connecticut residents have some great choices, as well as those traveling through the area.

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