Delaware’s Disc Golf Delights: A Compelling Journey through the Best Disc Golf Courses in Delaware

The best disc golf courses in Delaware boil down to a handful of small choices. After all, Delaware is ranked 49th in disc golf. While that sounds awful, it’s only because Delaware is so small and only has 14 courses. 

In a state with just a shade under 2,000 square miles, there’s only so much room left over for disc golf courses. Still, even with so small a selection, there are a few disc golf courses in Delaware that can go toe-to-toe with some of the best in the US.

In some ways, it’s advantageous for disc golfers to live in Delaware since every disc golf course in the state is probably within an hour’s drive. Plus, there are the nearby states of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New Hampshire to consider. All-in-all, Delaware is a great environment for disc golfers, and here is a list of the best the state has to offer.

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses in Delaware

Delaware is an undeniably pretty state, and it also has well over 300 miles of coastline. This opens the door for a fairly wide variety in disc golf topography throughout the state, despite its small size. 

Most of the disc golf courses I went with feature woods, to one degree or another, but nothing too extreme. Despite the low number of available courses in Delaware, there is a fair amount of variety, and everyone from beginner to advanced will find a challenge. 

  1. Beaver Branch (Best Disc Golf Course Overall)
  2. Killen Ponds State Park (Runner-Up)
  3. Iron Hill (Best Challenge)

In many aspects, Iron Hill is the best disc golf course in Delaware. However, it’s also probably the most challenging to play. I placed it in the third spot, not because it’s the third best, but because it might be more of a turn-off for players new to the sport. 

That doesn’t take anything away from Beaver Branch, however, which is still an excellent disc golf course in its own right and worthy of a high placing on my list. 

Best Disc Golf Courses in Delaware

Most of the state of Delaware consists of low flatlands with a coastal feel. It only begins to rise in the most northern part of the state. Despite these limitations, the disc golf courses here are unique and well-designed, with only the 18-hole courses making the list. 

Beaver Branch – Townsend (Best Disc Golf Course Overall)

Features

  • 3,064’ to 5,656’ course length
  • Rubber tee pads
  • Mach 3 baskets
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Heavily wooded
  • 18 holes
  • Four course options

Beaver Branch is a beautiful little course that feels like a nature hike as much as a competitive game of disc golf. Throughout the course, you’ll cross tiny streams and rivulets on wooden walkways and toss at baskets mounted on top of huge, cut logs. 

Though it’s a heavily wooded course, the fairways are wide and accommodating enough for disc golfers to let rip with overstable fairway drivers or their favorite mid-range plastics. The overgrowth in the OB is never bad, but it’s often high enough to hide the occasionally errant disc throw

The rubber tee pads may not sound as good as concrete or pavers, but the grippy feel really helps with your form, especially on throws that don’t require a lot of foot movement. There are technically water hazards, but they’re more like mud puddles than anything else. Overall, it’s a fantastic wooded course that presents a challenge but isn’t overkill. 

Killen Ponds State Park DGC – Delton (Runner-Up)

Features

  • Heavily wooded
  • 5,036’ to 5,813’ course length
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • Mach 2 baskets
  • 18 holes
  • Pay to play

The fairways at Killen Ponds State Park are excellent, well-manicured, and well-defined. Many of the doglegs are pretty intense, with nearly U-turn layouts that require some pretty specific lines. Mold your throws well, and be prepared to fight your way out of the woods. 

The park itself is beautiful as well, so you’ll get in as much exploration as playing time. Another thing I like about this course is it varies its angles. Don’t expect a bunch of doglegs to the right, back to back to back. Despite the heavy woods, strong winds are frequent and can be disruptive. 

Iron Hill – Newark (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 7,820’ to 10,045’ course length
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Heavily wooded
  • 18 holes
  • Cart friendly

Iron Hill might feel a little easier on the fairways but don’t mistake it for a simple course. There is a ton of challenge to be found here. The fairways are well-defined, but you can afford to be a few degrees off in your throws without slicing into a tree. 

The undergrowth isn’t bad, either. Even if you play with a camouflaged disc, you should still be able to find it if it goes off course. It is a very long course, but oddly enough, all of the tees are relatively close together. Iron Hill also features some entertaining basket locations as well. Iron Hill is a fantastic course, and the only thing that kept it from the number one spot was the degree of challenge over the other two. 

Bellevue State Park – Wilmington

Features

  • 4,400’ to 5,500’ course length
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • 18 holes
  • Pay to play
  • Cart friendly

Bellevue State Park DGC is interesting in that it surrounds the horse track as you play. This is one of those courses that should stand as an example for other disc golf courses in terms of meaningful differences between pro and amateur tees. 

Many courses just push the pro box back 50’ and call it a day. Here, you can tell the difference between pro and amateur. The fairway lines require some finesse, but it’s not brutally difficult. This is an excellent course to learn the game on and for a beginner to really step up their game. 

Brandywine Creek State Park – Wilmington 

Features

  • x3 water hazards
  • Mach V baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • 6,521’ to 7,157’ course length
  • Multiple pin locations 
  • Pay to play
  •  Pro and amateur tee pads
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes

Brandywine presents disc golfers with a hilly challenge, so be sure to bring your high-glide number plastics and your laser beams. Ultra high-speed discs will clear a close hill, and the discs with more glide will carry you over distant hills. 

It’s not a heavily wooded course, but the course designers did a fantastic job of overlaying the existing topography with a well-thought-out course. This course features a lot of incredible views as well. Since it’s elevated and sparsely wooded, windy days can play havoc on your long game. 

Lum’s Pond State Park – Bear

Features

  • 5,175’ course length
  • Multiple pin locations
  • 18 holes 
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Chainstar Baskets
  • Heavily wooded
  • Pay to play

Despite the fact that it’s called Lum’s Pond State Park and it does indeed feature a pond, there are no water hazards to deal with. However, this is a very challenging course, missing my ‘best challenge’ spot by a hair. It’s a heavily wooded, beautiful course that requires players to mold tight lines through narrow fairways. 

It’s one of the best disc golf courses in Delaware when it comes to pure flow. You can play badly and still breeze through from hole to hole, never encountering an identical challenge from one basket to the next. Lum’s Pond is the perfect place for intermediate players to up their game in a heavily wooded area. 

Trap Pond State Park – Laurel

Features

  • Heavily wooded
  • 6,695’ course length
  • Rubber tee pads
  • 18 holes
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Pay to play
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads

Another heavily wooded park, Trap Pond, does feature a few holes that are a bit more open. Throwing lines and fairways are well-defined throughout, and though it’s a tough little course, it lacks some of the more brutal doglegs of some of the other courses on this list.

It’s also yet another course in Delaware that features excellent marking and directions. This is not something I bring up very often, despite the fact that it’s an excellent poor. An ill-defined disc golf course can absolutely kill your game. Trap Pond is a beautiful park and features plenty of variety, despite the fact that most of it is in the woods. 

White Clay Creek State Park – Newark

Features

  • 4,778’ to 5,726’ course length
  • Single pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Chainstar baskets
  • 18 holes
  • Excellent beginner layout
  • Pay to play
  • Cart friendly

Last but not least, we have another course located in Newark, Delaware—White Clay Creek State Park. This course is neither too hilly nor too heavily wooded, making it an excellent spot for beginners to gravitate to. There’s still plenty of challenge, but the challenge is far more dependent on the approach rather than the drive. 

The park and course are well-maintained and well-marked throughout. You won’t have to worry about approaching any of the baskets out of order. This is a good place to work on your short-range drives, with fairway drivers and mid-range discs. However, the underbrush can get out of control, swallowing an errantly thrown disc. 

Final Putt

There you have it, the best disc golf courses in Delaware. As it happens, the courses on my list number over half of the courses in the state. Though there are only about 14 courses in Delaware, 3 of those are not 18-hole courses. 

On the bright side, that means your selection is pretty easy, and everything is within easy driving distance. Better yet, it’s a good motivator to try out some courses in adjacent states. Don’t worry; if we don’t already, we’ll have articles covering Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New Hampshire soon enough!

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