Best Disc Golf Courses In Great Britain: Disc Golf Destinations in the Commonwealth of Nations

The best disc golf courses in Great Britain a part of a larger network of 77 courses, less than half of which have 18 holes. 

Great Britain consists of England, Scotland, and Wales, along with the islands of those nations. Great Britain, England, and the UK are often used interchangeably for those who don’t know that it’s incorrect to do so. 

For what it’s worth, I’m glad all three are included because I think some of these courses have a lot of value, and I’d hate to exclude one!

My Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In Great Britain

I kind of wanted to squeeze a course from Wales into the top three. However, these are simply the best three in terms of what they offer. Honestly, ReBoot and Whitcomb Farm courses are a toss-up, and I would feel just as good about reversing their positions in the pecking order. 

While Great Britain isn’t going to light the disc golf world on fire (in terms of the best country for the sport) anytime soon, there’s no denying there are some fantastic gems here. Besides, it’s hard to argue with Great Britain’s topographical perfection. 

  1. Whitcombe Farm — Beaminster, England (Best Course Overall)
  2. Lilford Park Blue Course — Leigh, England (Best Challenge)
  3. ReBoot Disc Golf At Bluebell Woods — Dunbar, Scotland (Runner-Up)

The courses are spread out, few and far between, and often too small for serious players to bother with. Most of the land is owned, and without more private courses stepping up, England will remain a beautiful, fantastic place to play with only a handful of exceptional courses. 

Top 8 Best Disc Golf Courses In Great Britain (England, Scotland, Wales)

The best section of England is undoubtedly the Midlands, where most of the newest courses are springing up. Topographically speaking, England offers a little bit of everything, and there are definitely more than eight courses worth your time. 

Whitcombe Farm — Beaminster, England (Best Course Overall)

Features

  • 36 Holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Low tree density
  • Grass tee pads
  • Single tee pads
  • Locally manufactured baskets

Reading the features, you’d be forgiven for mistaking Whitcombe Farm for being a backwoods, half-baked disc golf course out in the middle of nowhere. However, that would be very far from the truth. Whitcombe Farm is a gorgeous course that’s played host to the British Open many times, as well as the European Championship. 

You don’t get to do that if your course is garbage. Whitcombe is one of the best disc golf courses in Great Britain in terms of aesthetics, but it’s also a ton of fun to play. It offers a healthy mix of shot types throughout, with some long downhill shots that are a blast to play. 

Lilford Park Blue Course — Leigh, England (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 3,400’ to 5,200’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • High tree density
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • Castle disc golf baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Natural tee pads

Lilford Park is not the most well-known course in England, but it’s one of the most challenging, thanks to the high tree density throughout the course. While there are no extreme elevation changes, you will fight moderate elevation and high tree density from beginning to end, a tough challenge for all but the most veteran players. 

This is one of those challenging courses that is still a lot of fun to play, however, even as you’re beating yourself up for trying to chop down that tree with your high-speed driver. Also, like most courses and places in England, it is a beautiful park and probably one of the more serene courses to play, outside of your own screams of frustration. 

ReBoot Disc Golf At Bluebell Woods — Dunbar, Scotland (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 1,400’ to 6,100’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • Moderate tree density
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Pay to play
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • Prodigy baskets

Otherwise known as Bluebell Woods Disc Golf, ReBoot is a stunning course that demands a big arm if you want to play from the pro pads. The good news is, though the tree density is moderate, the fairways are well-defined, if sometimes difficult to navigate without an accurate release window. Elevation changes are moderate as well, but they do play a role in your game. 

Some baskets are located on the side of slopes, which means that a well-placed shot is often not enough. Come in too strong; you may send your disc rolling for half a mile. It’s a well-maintained course with a lot of eye candy for the nature enthusiasts out there. I would also like to reemphasize the fact that this course could easily be in the number one spot. 

Quarry Park — Warwickshire, England

Features

  • 5,500’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x6 water hazards
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Astroturf tee pads
  • Private course
  • Pay to play

Though it’s a private, pay-to-play course, the expense is a trivial thing compared to the incredible experience you’ll get from playing at Quarry Park. On many lists, Quarry Park sits in the top spot, and deservedly so. The course features several ways to play it, so you can roll through and come away with a different experience each time. 

It’s also a stunning course, perhaps one of the best natural wonders you can play on throughout the entire UK. Unfortunately, it does have multiple water hazards throughout, and you may walk away with a lighter disc golf bag at the end of the day. The thing is, playing this course may make it worthwhile to lose a disc or two. 

Longford Park DGC — Manchester, England

  • 4,200’ to 5,600’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Flat with low tree density

Longford Park is the first on the list to really cut beginner disc golfers some slack. It’s not an easy course, per se, but it is relatively free of trees and elevation changes. It’s also a fantastic place for breaking out your high-speed drivers and really let it rip.

There are enough trees throughout to form easily recognizable fairways, but even if your disc is blown off course or you miss your release window, the disc isn’t likely to vanish in the undergrowth. In fact, unless you’re playing OB, you’ll easily find some innovative approaches to get you back on course. 

Stonehenge DGC — Wiltshire, England

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Flat with light tree density
  • Mach V baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Grass tee pads

Stonehenge DGC is another fantastic course for beginners to really get into the game. It offers enough challenge not to make the sport a turn-off without being overwhelming for those stepping onto the course for the first time. The design features a natural flow from each basket to the next hole, so it’s not difficult to navigate. 

It’s also a short course. While this may not be amenable to more experienced players, it’s great for beginners and those who want to slip in a quick game in a short time frame. Stonehenge is a stepping stone, more than anything else, and will help boost a beginner to the next level. 

Felin Geri DGC — Newcastle, Wales

Features

  • 3,600’ course length
  • 20 holes
  • x9 water hazards
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Gravel tee pads
  • Castle baskets
  • Pay to play

Felin Geri DGC is one of those marvels in that it’s a disc golf course that functions and is well-played while existing over marshland. When it rains, this course returns to the primordial soup of billions of years ago. Even when there is a decent amount of time between rains, there are still 9 water hazards to deal with. 

While there are a few potential ace runs throughout, the tradeoff is that you are likely to lose a disc on most of your playthroughs. It just is what it is. If you want a challenge, bring your less favorable disc, and you’ll get it while not having to sweat it so badly if one of the discs ends up in the water. 

Aros Park DGC —Isle of Mull, Scotland

Features

  • 13 holes
  • Carpet tee pads
  • 2,100’ course length
  • Latitude 64 Pro baskets
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations

Last but not least, we have a relatively short but fun course in Aros Park DGC. Though it’s a short one, the course makes up for it by offering a challenging mix of elevation and wooded holes, with clearly defined fairways that require a bit of finesse.

Some of the holes require you to thread the needle, so beginners may suffer to a degree. However, after playing this course for a little while, it will definitely improve your accuracy and release windows. There are no water hazards, but the course can get pretty slick after a rain. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Great Britain

The best disc golf courses in Great Britain are a little more spread out than they are in other countries or some of the states. The reason is twofold: Great Britain constitutes more than one country, and there are not that many disc golf courses in each country.

Regardless, Great Britain has more than one diamond in the rough, and if you get a chance to play one of these disc golf courses, they are more than worth your time.

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