Hawaii’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Aloha Aces

You won’t find many disc golf courses in Hawaii—only 28, to be exact—but the ones you will find are impressive courses in their own right. Though Hawaii is ranked 48th in disc golf, that’s mostly because it’s an island, small, and has a far different culture than most of the landside states. 

However, just because the course numbers are limited doesn’t mean they aren’t enjoyable or that the sport isn’t popular. Of the 28 courses, 19 feature a full 18 holes. I narrowed them down to the 8 best disc golf courses in Hawaii. There are also 13 disc golf leagues throughout the state and 4 disc golf stores to choose from. 

Oahu Disc Golf is a disc golf retreat where residents of Hawaii can go to learn the fundamentals of the game and discover a whole community of disc golfers. So there’s more to disc golf in the Aloha State than outsiders may believe, and I’ve compiled a nifty list of the best disc golf courses throughout the state for visitors and newbies alike. 

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses in Hawaii

Picking the best out of 28 courses is not as easy as it sounds. Where some states have hundreds, Hawaii only has a handful. What makes it hard is the fact that the best disc golf courses in such a small pool don’t often stand out. 

However, I always stick to my guns on this one. I break these courses down based on their designs. Do the fairways make sense? Are they fair within the scope of the game (as in, not featuring obstacles that are just there to aggravate and interrupt the flow of the fairway line)? What are the course features? How do those features work within the whole? Is it fun?

  1. Gargoyle’s Garden – Mountain View (Best Course Overall)
  2. Mauka DGC – Princeville (Runner-Up)
  3. Kahului Community Park – Kahului (Best Challenge)

Another thing that I learned about Hawaii very quickly was that navigating to disc golf courses is sometimes very difficult. I’ll throw in a note or two on each course if you have to contact someone or if you need a course guide throughout the game. 

Best Disc Golf Courses in Hawaii

Whether you’re visiting Hawaii or a current resident, jumping into the world of disc golf for the first time, Hawaii has a handful of terrific disc golf courses for you to up your game. Some are more challenging than others, but all are playable by beginners. No matter what bracket you fall into, you’ll have a blast on these courses. 

Gargoyle’s Garden – Mountain View (Best Course Overall)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Natural tee pads
  • Heavily wooded
  • Reservations required
  • Standard baskets
  • Cart friendly

Before I dive into this thing, I have to admit, Gargoyle’s Garden sounds like an ominous yet fantastic disc golf course. The owner of the course is a man by the name of Mike, and you will have to call ahead of time to get permission to play. Fortunately, he’s as nice as it gets and will happily walk you through the course. 

The fairways here are really tight, with unique but entirely fair lines throughout. You’ll never feel like you’re playing the same hole twice. It’s the kind of course where you need to bring every type of disc in your bag because the odds are good you’ll need it. 

The course aesthetic is gorgeous and well-maintained (you’re basically in a tropical forest), though the underbrush is just enough to hide the occasional wayward disc. Beginners may struggle a bit, but advanced players will find plenty to sharpen their game. 

Mauka DGC – Princeville (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • x2 water hazards
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Pay to play
  • 6,170’ to 9,279’ course length
  • A mixture of tee pad types
  • Cart friendly

Mauka is relatively new, yet it quickly skyrocketed up the rankings to become one of the all-time favorites of both visiting disc golfers and residents. Disc golfers looking to challenge the new course will find a healthy mixture of technical shots throughout. 

The course design also features a few mandos if you want to count them in your game, along with a couple of moderate water hazards and a perfect mix of hole types. Bring all of your discs so you can take advantage of doglegs, wide-open, tunnel shots, and blind shots.

There’s a clubhouse onsite for those who need to purchase discs, along with bathrooms throughout. The biggest drawback to this course is that playing it requires you to fork over a whopping $30, which is a huge fee considering the average cost to play disc golf courses in America

Kahului Community Park – Kahului (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 3,500’ to 4,600’ course length
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Frequent winds

Picking the best challenge was a bit difficult. None of the disc golf courses on this list are brutally challenging, and any beginner will do just fine on all of them. However, from a learning perspective, especially for beginners and intermediate players, I felt like Kahului had the most to offer. 

That’s especially true when you consider Kahului is one of the windiest courses, so you’ll have to carefully select your discs (heavier, overstable discs in a headwind, lighter, understandable discs in a tailwind). Crosswinds deserve an article all their own. 

There are some interesting elevation shots as well, which are always problematic when facing heavy winds. For the most part, the holes are under 300’, so you won’t need your high-speed driver and a blind toss or two for good measure.

HCC X ODG – Waipahu

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Cart friendly
  • Veteran baskets
  • Wood chip tee pads
  • Tallgrass
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Mixed shots

The HCC X ODG stands for the Hawaii Country Club (one of the oldest clubs in Hawaii) Oahu Disc Golf. The X is essentially a conjunction. Despite the weirdness of the name, HCC is a fantastic course that’s practically brand new (A professional course designed and implemented in 20210).

It quickly become a very popular course, with a fantastic mixture of wooded and wide-open shots. It also includes some unique terrain uses for the baskets, such as placing one basket under a sideways tree and another mounted on wood blocks. 

It’s not brutally challenging, but disc golfers of every stripe will find something at HCC to help develop their game. The surrounding scenery is phenomenal as well. As you take in the distant Koolau Mountains, you’ll face long and short shots, doglegs, and uphill challenges. 

LavaLinks – Mountain View

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 4,373’ to 4,952’ course length
  • Mixed tee pads
  • Dynamic Veteran baskets
  • Cart friendly
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Pay-to-play membership

We’ll start with the biggest drawback—you have to be a member to play. LavaLinks requires a membership if you want to take advantage of their fantastic disc golf course. If you’re visiting, you can take advantage of the one-day trial, which is $10. After that, it’s membership only. 

LavaLinks is mostly open; however, this is one of those courses where the term “open” is deceptive. There are sporadic, short trees throughout these open areas that will be more than happy to slap your disc down. The wooded shots are not heavily wooded, with a lot of space between the trees.

You’ll still be able to take advantage of some of your high-speed drivers without the need to leave your fairway drivers at home. LavaLinks is more of a game of finesse, learning how to get that sweet s-curve on your disc without whacking an errant tree. 

Kai’aka – Haleiwa

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Grass tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Mixed wooded and wide-open shots
  • x2 water hazards
  • Cart friendly

Kai’aka DGC is another beautiful disc golf course and a great place for beginners, despite the water hazards. The water hazards might be an issue on windy days because the water sits to the left of you on holes 14 and 16, with hole 16 requiring a smaller, over-the-water throw. 

Outside of that, the course is a great mix of open and moderately wooded shots. Doglegs to the left or right are not really in play here, though you will want to hyzer or anhyzer out and back in on several shots. Speaking of, it’s a great way for beginners to learn their angles. 

Hole 17 is your longest shot but nothing that stronger arms can’t handle. For the rest of the open shots, you can grip and rip but should probably avoid using your ultra-high-speed drivers for fear of going too far. 

Lydgate – Kapaa

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Cart friendly
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • 54-par course

Like all of the disc golf parks on this list, Lydgate is another gorgeous one. It certainly helps that even if you’re having a bad day on the course, you’ll still have a heck of a view. Looking at the course overall, it’s a very beginner-friendly course, with a good amount of open and wooded shots. 

There are elevation changes, but they are subtle at best, just enough to make you rethink those low-flying laser throws. A few of the shorter shots can get complicated, with one being a tunnel shot and a few others featuring heavy woods. 

Also, Lydgate is frequently windy. It helps that it’s mostly flat terrain, but you’ll definitely want to bring your most understandable and most overstable discs to counter the windy days. Occasionally, it’s calm and slightly breezy, but not always. 

Kohala Winds DGC – Kapaau

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 5,452’ course length 
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • Prodigy baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Decent elevation changes
  • Cart friendly 
  • Pay to play 

Kohala Winds DGC rounds out our list of the best disc golf courses in Hawaii. It’s a well-mapped and well-maintained course with a good mix of shot types throughout. Some of the elevation changes are fairly moderate and will require some thinking and maybe a higher glide number on your disc. 

There are some distance challenges here as well, so be sure to bring your high-speed drivers and plenty of elbow grease. As far as the woods are concerned, trees are few and far between, though there are still enough to slap down the occasional disc, depending on what hole you’re on. 

It’s a long course to walk overall, but the surrounding terrain is worth taking in. As with many courses on this list, it’s Hawaii, so the wind is sometimes prevalent, and it can get pretty heavy at times. It’s always good practice to bring discs in the over and under stable extremes along for the ride. 

Final Putt

Hawaii is home to some fantastic disc golf courses and also offers some of the more gorgeous views of all fifty states. Of course, it depends on your preferred aesthetic, but no one goes to Hawaii because they think it’s ugly. 

Hawaii also has some of the more wind-challenge courses you will find anywhere. However, once you figure out the over and under stability of the discs in your bag, it’s nothing you can’t overcome. Overall, though Hawaii doesn’t have a boatload of courses to offer, it does have some very good ones. If you’re looking for a challenge and a lot of fun, you’ll find it in any one of these best disc golf courses in Hawaii.

Be sure to let us know what your favorite Hawaiian disc golf course is, in the comments.

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