Idaho’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Uncovering the Finest Disc Golf Courses in the Gem State

Some of the best disc golf courses in Idaho are also some of the best in the world. Idaho ranks in the middle of the pack (in terms of the best disc golf states). But the state also hosts one of the top ten disc golf courses in the world. Even the Army Corps of Engineers isn’t immune to the growth of the sport. 

It helps that Idaho is highly ranked as one of the most naturally beautiful states in the country. Part of what makes disc golf such a fantastic sport is the opportunity to experience the great outdoors. It’s a sport with a lot of hiking, and Idaho is the perfect place for the avid outdoorsman. 

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses In Idaho

Most people use the UDisc app to search for the best disc golf courses. This is especially true of beginners. As a player, I don’t put much faith in an app. I’d rather apply my experience to the features of the course in question before I gauge where to place it on a list. 

  1. Caliber DGC – Sandpoint (Best Overall)
  2. Wreckreator – Bayview (Runner-Up)
  3. Corbin Park – Post Falls (Best for a Challenge)

The first thing I look for is what I call ‘gimmick’ design features. In other words, did the course designer keep those trees in place because it flows well and presents a challenge or because they thought it would be a funny place to put trees to smack down discs? 

I like the “tough but reasonable or fair” approach. Difficulty and challenges are great, but gimmick features are not. The course should challenge players to strategize and mold new lines—get out of their comfort zones with anhyzer and hyzer releases. 

If I can look at a fairway and hold an internal debate over a meathook mid-range or a tomahawk overhand, I know I’m on the right track. That’s how I choose courses, and the result is the below list of courses that I feel are the best that Idaho has to offer!

Best Disc Golf Courses in Idaho

Caliber DGC – Sandpoint (Best Overall)

Features

  • x2 water hazards
  • 7,785’ to 8,788’ course length
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • 18 holes
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Pay to play

Caliber is frequently listed in the 7th or 8th spot as one of the top ten best disc golf courses in the world. It didn’t earn that spot because of gimmicks and beautiful topography. It has none of the former and a lot of the latter. 

This course is fantastically designed with dual fairways, par 4s, 5s, and multiple approach options on nearly every hole. It’s challenging without being overwhelming. The surrounding terrain is stunning, and the winding nature of the course is absolutely addicting. 

There are elevation changes throughout, split fairways with excellent signage, natural OBs (out-of-bounds), and a course design that’s very difficult to play the same way twice. 

Wreckreator – Athol (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 6,239’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Pay to play
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads

What an epic name for a disc golf course. While it’s not the most challenging course in the universe, it can definitely wreck your day. (yes, I went there with the weak pun). There are a lot of trees on this course, but the fairways are generally wide and fair. 

What makes Wreckrator similar to Caliber is the variety of approaches on multiple holes. You don’t have to approach the same hole the same way every time. Strategy is important, and this course does more than most to build your arsenal of skills. There are also a few ‘grip and rip’ holes out here for those who bag several high-speed drivers

Corbin Park – Post Falls (Best for a Challenge)

Features

  • x3 water holes
  • 3,887’ course length
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • 18 holes

The challenge of this course is the density of the woods and the tightness of the fairways. However, as I mentioned above, the trees on this course aren’t there just for a gimmicky, slap-your-disc-down purpose. The fairways are well-defined, but you better bring your finesse game and throw lasers. 

Fortunately, it’s a very short course, which is usually a good thing for beginners. If you’re having a bad day on this course, it will be short-lived. If there’s one thing that holds this course back, it’s the removal of basket #5 throughout the summer—to accommodate park visitors. 

Freeman Park – Idaho Falls

Features

  • x4 water holes
  • 18 holes
  • 6,093’ course length
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads

It’s not a heavily wooded park. In fact, the entire time you’re playing, you will feel like you’re in a very stereotypical park. The challenge comes into play with long-drive shot placement. Since the trees are sporadic, it requires the back half of your drive to land where you want it. If not, the trees are likely to catch it. 

On the bright side, there is essentially zero undergrowth, so it’s very easy to recover. There are a few tosses over a narrow creek, so it takes some pretty bad luck to actually land a disc in it. However, it’s the psychological factor of the water’s existence that toys with your throwing mechanics. Overall, it’s a beautiful, well-maintained park that’s a lot of fun to play. 

Tamarack Resort – Donnelly

Features

  • 6,552’ to 7,118’ course length
  • Rubber tee pads
  • Mach III baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Unique uphill/downhill design
  • 18 holes
  • Rugged terrain

The most unique part of this course is the gradual incline of the first nine holes and the downhill play of the back 9. Featuring a moderately wooded design, you’ll spend the front nine gradually moving and throwing upwards—mostly short shots. Then, things reverse for the back half. 

That’s where the difficulty lies. You get used to throwing at upward angles. Then, not only do you have to switch to downward angles, but the back 9 features much longer drives. It’s unique and fun to play, with a straightforward design cunningly laid out over a very useful terrain aspect. 

Lake Walcott State Park – Rupert

Features

  • 5,619’ to 5,775’ course length
  • Rubber tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • x3 water holes
  • Pay to play

This course features the best variety, in terms of hole length, throughout 18 holes. At Lake Walcott State Park, you’ll face everything from short drives that require little more than a mid-range or putter to far more epic grip and rip drives at nearly 700’.

The woods come into play more on the back nine, which is a fortuitous opportunity to work your way into the game. It also features multiple pin locations so you can choose your challenge and approach based on what basket you want to throw at. 

North Star – Athol

Features

  • 4,994’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Pay to play
  • Moderate elevation changes

North Star features an excellent mixture of doglegs left, right, and straight throws across its moderate course length. It’s the kind of course where you would do well to bring a mixed bag of disc types. You can probably play the entire course with a speedy putter or a solid mid-range with a moderate to heavy fade—like the Dynamic Discs Justice or Verdict. 

North Star is also an excellent example for course designers. For those who like to incorporate trees, North Star is the course to look at. There are plenty of them, but the fairways are carved out using the trees as a perimeter, forcing players to mold tight lines and restrain themselves from putting too much elbow grease into their drives. 

Cutthroat – Athol

Features

  • 9,397’ to 10,580’ course length
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single lin locations
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • 18 holes
  • Pay to play

Bring your ultra, high-speed drivers…all of them. This is a long course with booming, long-distance drive opportunities that you don’t see often. There are plenty of par 4s and 5s, and you’ll really have a blast developing your ultra-long game. 

That doesn’t mean you should neglect your mid-ranges and putters; however, the course features some wooded holes as well, including a fairly tight one midway through. Despite its length, it’s one of the more cleverly laid out, long-distance courses in the state. The best part is you start where you end. 

Final Putt

For those looking for the best disc golf courses in Idaho, you might be wondering why I didn’t throw Farragut in the mix. Farragut is amazing, but it’s not a disc golf course itself. It’s a park that contains many of the disc golf courses on this list. In fact, Farragut is one of the best places to go in the state for a pure disc golf experience. 

North Star, Wreckreator, and Cutthroat are all a part of Farragut. I almost included Little Black Bear and AWOL as two on the list, but I didn’t want to stick strictly to Farragut. Regardless, there are close to 140 courses in Idaho, growing monthly. 

If you’re new to the game of disc golf and looking for some of the best courses in the gem state, your options are nearly limitless, with a ton of exciting and well-designed courses to choose from. 

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