Kentucky’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Premier Disc Golf in The Blue Grass State

The best disc golf courses in Kentucky are synonymous with art. In this case, it is the art of carving a complicated network of fairways, tee boxes, and baskets out of raw, unfiltered, natural landscape. Kentucky is a beautiful country, and the top-notch disc golf courses in the Bluegrass State take full advantage of that.

The best course designers put in the work, converting every inch of real estate into tactical design features that mold newbie disc golfers into veteran players. Some of the best and most challenging courses are found in Kentucky because of those course designs. 

My job is to separate the wheat from the chaff, and Kentucky makes it a difficult proposition, much less a doable task. Though Kentucky is a middling state (ranked 26th), with only 156 courses, it’s all about quality over quantity. Fortunately for you and me, Kentucky has a ton of the former.

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses in Kentucky

I faced a difficult crossroads while choosing the top 3. Idlewild is a nearly world-renowned disc golf course and sits on the top of just about every top 10 list of disc golf courses throughout the United States. However, Arrowhead, despite the recent controversies, is a close second. 

The reason Arrowhead gets the nod on this list is the challenge of playing Idlewild. The course is known for being a brutal, uphill (sometimes literally) battle for disc golfers new to the game. With that being said, here are my top 3 in a list of 8:

  1. Arrowhead DGC – Louisville (Best Overall)
  2. Holler in the Hills – Brownsville (Runner-Up)
  3. Idlewild – Burlington (Best Challenge)

Each one of these courses is enormously popular statewide, not just within their local communities. Disc golfers traveling through are far more likely to turn one of these courses into a pit stop. I certainly have throughout my time in Tennessee and Kentucky over the years. 

As far as I’m concerned, these top three courses are separated by a hair (if that much), and any one of them could be the #1 course in the state. Fortunately, Kentucky has far more than just three. Kentucky also has a wildly varied topography, allowing disc golf designers to really flex their creativity. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses in Kentucky

Kentucky is a state with scores of ecoregions, which is highly advantageous for ambitious disc golf course designers. With so much to work with, it’s difficult to define a course by its strategic and competitive value versus its overall beauty. The best courses take advantage of both, and here they are.

Arrowhead DGC – Louisville (Best Overall)

Features

  • 27 holes
  • x10 water hazards
  • Pavers tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Mixed basket types
  • Private course

Arrowhead is an outstanding course and, unfortunately, it went through a period of controversy when the course closed down. There was a zoning issue that has since been rectified, and the course is now open again. It’s a good thing, too, because this is one of the best heavily wooded courses in Kentucky and surrounding states. 

It features a unique flow and vibe you can feel as you play. Just be aware of the multiple water hazards throughout. Despite the heavy woods and water, it’s not a brutally challenging course. It’s a blast to play, and you’ll find yourself starting a second round as often as not. Now that the course has reopened, it’s one of the heaviest-played courses in the area. 

Holler in the Hills – Brownsville (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 5,331’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x5 water hazards
  • Prodigy baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Moderate elevation changes

Holler in the Hills has to be one of the more unique names in the disc golf course lexicon. It’s a tough little course to crack for moderately skilled players, and it features just about every natural obstacle you can imagine, including cliffs, streams, hills, huge rocks, and deep valleys.

The course design features several challenging holes that somehow manage to be extremely fun, even when you’re deep in the woods in full recovery mode. There are a moderate number of precision fairways but nothing overwhelming. Strategic players will find a lot to challenge them. 

Idlewild – Burlington (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 24 holes
  • 7,132’ to 11,039’ course length
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Dynamic Veteran baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • x10 water hazards

Idlewild could have easily been the number one spot on my list if it weren’t for the brutal challenge of the course. First, it’s a massive course, with the pro tees stretching things out to over two miles. The challenge is there for professional players, and newbies will simply be embarrassed their first few times out. 

Despite that, the course is incredible, and once you develop some skills, will quickly become your favorite course. The course features a perfect mix of wooded and open holes, tight lines through punishing fairways, a ton of walking, and both a creek and lake that come into play throughout. 

Lincoln Ridge Park – Independence

Features

  • 7,237’ to 7,886’ course length 
  • 24 holes
  • x7 water hazards
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Chainstar baskets
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads

There’s a recurring theme of multiple water hazards throughout this list so far. The fact is, there’s a lot more water throughout Kentucky than most people realize. Lincoln Ridge Park is no exception, and the course throws everything else at you as well.

This includes rock climbing and plenty of extreme elevation changes. Be sure to bring your hiking boots for this one. For those who love ‘bombers’, Lincoln Ridge features a very nice downhill bomber right off the bat. It’s a stunning course but be prepared for a ton of up-and-down play. 

Graviss McDonald’s DGC – Versailles

Features

  • 18 holes
  • x2 water hazards
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Prodigy baskets
  • 6,650’ to 8,723’ course length
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Single tee pads

Another Kentucky course that’s often considered to be a ‘pro’ course, Graviss McDonald’s is nevertheless an excellent course for beginners to veterans alike. There is a lot of wide open play here, so if you have some ultra-high-speed drivers in your bag, bring’em. 

It’s the perfect course for those looking to improve their distance game, but if you play the OB, it becomes much harder. The course is also rife with rolling hills, forcing players to consider whether or not they want to throw a laser beam or stick with more glide. 

Mahr Park – Madisonville

Features

  • Two Parks (rec and pro)
  • 27 holes
  • X7 water hazards
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations

Mahr Park includes a small, 9-hole course for beginners and a full, 18-hole course for those taking the next step. It’s fairly easy to go out and hit both courses back-to-back, however. Strangely enough, the recreational course features 6 of the 7 water hazards, so be prepared for that. 

Both courses are moderately wooded, with the trees spaced out enough for disc golfers to carve tight lines or have their discs smacked out of the sky if the angle is a bit off. The courses also take advantage of the rolling hills, both throwing down and up.

Lover’s Lane Park – Bowling Green

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 5,950’ course length
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Prodigy baskets

Lover’s Lane Park is just what it sounds like, a quiet, peaceful park with gently rolling hills and enough woods to make things interesting on the front 9. For the most part, the course is open and beginner-friendly. 

The part where the course winds into the woods is the best, however, since it offers an excellent design that forces players to carve tight lines to stay in the fairway. This is an excellent course for first-time players, with just enough to keep it interesting for intermediate disc golfers.

Armco Park Blue & White – Ashland

Features

  • 37 holes
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • 6,174’ to 8,324’ (Blue) and 3,684’ to 5,144’ (white) course length

Armco Blue is probably the more popular of the two, but since the park offers two courses, may as well play both! Beginners should hit up the white course first and work their way over to the more advanced blue course. 

While the white course is sparsely wooded and more open, the blue course delves deeper into the wood line, featuring tight throws and doglegs. However, the white course occasionally demands a more technical shot from players, so don’t chalk it up to the ‘easy’ course through and through.

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Kentucky

The best disc golf courses in Kentucky are outstanding, despite the fact that the state doesn’t stand out amongst its peers when it comes to the sport. Still, disc golf is growing in popularity everywhere you look, and Kentucky isn’t exempt from the attraction of the sport. 

Besides, the top three courses on this list are capable of standing shoulder-to-shoulder with some of the best courses across the country, especially Arrowhead, and Idlewild.  Kentucky is a beautiful state with or without disc golf courses, so it’s a wonderful opportunity to get out and enjoy the sights and sounds while playing an addictive, affordable, and fun game. 

These are the kinds of parks that pull the newbies in and grow the sport exponentially. If Kentucky keeps it up, they just might rise in the ranks after all. 

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