Louisiana’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Exploring the Pelican State’s Finest

The best disc golf courses in Louisiana are fantastic examples of the best the sport has to offer. Although Louisiana is ranked 40th in terms of disc golf states, that’s not saying much when the quality is certainly there. Louisiana is limited to only 80 courses throughout the state, which plays a role in the state’s ranking. 

One thing that can’t be said about Louisiana is that it’s an ugly state. Some of the disc golf courses on this list are located in incredible locations. Louisiana is known for its lush swamplands and trees laced with Spanish moss. 

Designing disc golf courses throughout the topography typically found in Louisiana is no mean feat. It takes some unique designs and a careful eye to take advantage of the terrain. Louisiana is also known for some of the best state park disc golf courses as well, which I’ll cover on my list as well. 

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses in Louisiana

Louisiana is well within my stomping grounds, and picking the best courses for this list was no easy task. Everything down here is mostly flatlands, with elevation changes being the exception rather than the rule. The best courses, in my oh-so-humble opinion, are the ones that take advantage of the terrain in unique and challenging ways. 

While designing a course in a pretty place is one thing, a bland design with little to no challenge or uniqueness will kill a course’s popularity quickly. 

  1. Parc Des Families DGC – Marrero (Best Overall)
  2. Lake Claiborne State Park – Homer (Runner-Up)
  3. City Park – New Orleans (Best Challenge)

These three courses represent variety. Parc Des Families and Lake Claiborne are both phenomenal courses in their own right and represent the best the sport has to offer, and City Park offers slightly more challenge than the other two (thanks to some bomber birdies and tunnel shots). 

Louisiana’s unique geography and diverse landscapes provide opportunities for both recreational and competitive disc golf.

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses in Louisiana

While all 8 of the disc golf courses on this list are fantastic examples of what the state has to offer, the top three are all very close to one another. This is especially true for Parc Des Families and Lake Claiborne. The biggest thing that separates City Park is an increase in challenge. 

Beginners playing at City Park may lose the thrill along with some plastic while playing at City Park dealing with the rough and a couple of water hazards. The rest are incredible courses as well. You gotta love Louisiana’s relatively mild climate, scenic locations, opportunities for beginners, and potential for growth throughout the state. 

Parc Des Families DGC – Marrero (Best Overall)

Features

  • 5,739’ to 8,466’ course length
  • x2 water hazards
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads

At this point, I’ve written more mini-reviews on disc golf courses throughout the US than I can count. I have to say that Parc Des Families DGC gets more praise from locals and visitors than any park I have ever seen. Now, that might be different in reality, but it certainly seems that way.

People tend to fall in love with this park. It’s a John Houck-designed course and only features two water hazards in play. It’s a visually stunning course with plenty of versatility. You can easily break out every disc in your bag. It also features practice baskets, park amenities, and opportunities to picnic. 

Lake Claiborne State Park – Homer (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 36 Holes
  • 4,687’ to 5,821’ course length Dogwood and 5,200’ to 7,391’ course length Whitetail
  • Concrete Tee Pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

Lake Claiborne is an all-day affair, with two large courses and plenty to do between the two of them. Better yet, they both feature elevation changes that are well integrated into the course design (a rarity in Louisiana, Florida, and Mississippi). 

Dogwood is the shorter course, but both are woods-heavy affairs, and both are stunning courses from a purely visual experience. As woods courses, there are a lot of par 3s, but the courses make excellent use of the elevation changes, and the lines are tight but fair. Bring some discs that really allow you to mold your lines and gain a tactical advantage on each hole.

City Park – New Orleans (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Multiple pin locations
  • x2 water hazards

One of the best aspects of City Park is its versatility. You have multiple baskets to go at and multiple tee boxes to start from. You can play the course multiple times and never play it the same way. It also has a good mix of par 5s, 4s, and 3s. It’s essentially one of the most varied courses on any of my recent lists.

If there’s one thing that holds City Park back, it’s the navigation signage, which is subpar at best, and it’s easy to skip a hole on accident if you’re a newbie to the course. The challenge increases with tunnel shots over the water, and the course even features a triple mando. 

Acadiana Park – Lafayette

Features

  • 4,197’ to 4,934’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads

Like City Park, Acadiana features multiple pin locations and professional or amateur tee boxes, making the versatility exceptional. There are actually two parks here, with the one I’m reviewing known as the “Ace Run” and the second park known as “Duzee.” 

What really makes this park exceptional, however, is the surrounding trees, few of which are younger than two centuries. When you’re playing surrounded by ancient (at least by American standards) trees, it creates an interesting and haunting vibe. 

Pa Davis – Lafayette

Features

  • 6,488’ course length
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Concrete pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • 18 holes
  • Flatland

Down here in flat country, we have to get innovative in our course designs, and Pa Davis is an exceptional example of what you can do with nothing zero elevation. However, this is considered to be a beginner’s course, which kept it from being higher on the list. 

On the bright side, it’s the perfect place for beginners to embark on their disc golfing journey—professionally or as a hobbyist. It has a lot of open areas, so you can put some zip on your discs. It also has a few (in the front 9) wooded holes for some variety. 

Solomon Conference Center DGC – Loranger

Features

  • 18 holes
  • x8 water hazards
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • 5,014’ course length

Solomon likes to mix things up in stages, with a little open area in the beginning, some rolling hills in the middle, and some wooded areas in the back 9. However, the water abounds throughout the entirety of the course. 

Fortunately, the presence of the lake is not a huge obstacle, just a reminder that if you let go way too early or grip the disc for too long, the lake will own your disc. There’s a small water carry towards the end, but it’s nothing a moderate player can’t carry—mainly an obstacle for first-timers and very new players. 

Highland Road Park – Baton Rouge

Features

  • 5,017’ to 7,415’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Moderate elevation changes

Even though there is only one tee pad for each hole, you have a choice of which permanent basket you want to throw at. Basically a different variation from traditional pro and amateur tee pads. It’s a nice way to mix things up and inject some versatility without requiring disc golfers to find the second or third tee pad. 

Highland Park has one of the best opening holes on the list, and the entire course offers a variety of shot types throughout. There are elevated baskets, player versus elevation, tight lines, wooded, and open shots. It’s a great course for getting in a little practice with a variety of plastics. 

Greenwood Park – Baker

Features

  • 4,512’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x3 water hazards
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Mach III baskets
  • Concrete tee pads

Greenwood toys with your expectations a bit. The front nine are almost all tightly wooded and, with the course saving the bombers for the last 11 or so holes, tightly confined with narrow fairways that require precision accuracy. 

After that, you can exercise your arm a bit, and it’s all bombs away. It’s a mostly flat course, with a lot of trees upfront, becoming more sporadic on the back end. It’s also a quick course, so you can easily play it twice without blowing through half the day. Get out there early enough, and you’ll finish before it gets too hot. 

Final Putt

Although Louisiana doesn’t get a lot of cinematography love on the big or the small screen, it’s a truly gorgeous state. The best disc golf courses in Louisiana are relatively few, but they’re loaded with eye candy. Of course, not every disc golfer enjoys the sport for its beautiful surroundings. 

Fortunately, for those types, Louisiana offers more than a handful of quality courses with enough challenge for veteran players of the sport without being the outright bane of disc golf beginners.

Keep in mind, just because it doesn’t end up on the “best” list doesn’t mean Louisiana lacks exceptional courses. If you’re looking for a fantastic course throughout the state, odds are good you’ll find one. 

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