Maryland’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Unveiling the Ultimate Disc Golf Destinations

When it comes to the best disc golf courses in Maryland, everybody has their own opinion. Some states have disc golf courses that are so good that they rank at the top of every list. Most other states don’t have that luxury.

Maryland is not world-renowned for its disc golf courses (the state is ranked 35th in the US). It’s a small state, however, and still maintains nearly 100 courses. Some Maryland residents will porcelain Turkey Hill as the king of the mountain, while others point to Seneca Creek. 

So which one is truly the best? As a disc golfer, the strategic value of a disc golf course stems from the fact that it teaches you something each time you play it. Every time you walk away, you’re a better disc golfer because of it. If a disc golf course can’t do that, it doesn’t belong on the list. 

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses in Maryland

The aforementioned Seneca Creek and Turkey Hill are synonymous with disc golf in Maryland. But they aren’t the only disc golf courses worthy of recognition throughout the state. My criteria are fairly simple, and if you’ve read some of my previous posts, you already know.

The course has to feature a strategic design that challenges the player. Not cheap tricks like throwing a copse of trees in the middle of the fairway that block all approaches to the basket. Unique design features that force players to improve their lines go a long way with me. 

  1. Seneca Creek State Park – Gaithersburg (Best Overall)
  2. Turkey Hill DGC – La Plata (Runner-Up)
  3. Woodsboro Regional Park – Woodsboro (Best Challenge)

These three courses are hardly the only courses on my list, but they deserve a place in the top three for a variety of reasons. All three are beautiful parks, well-designed throughout, and offer both new players and veterans a significant challenge. 

Newbies might want to work their way up to Woodsboro, mostly because it’s all woods and requires some tight lines and hiking shoes. I also love how each course utilizes the terrain to create challenges without turning the terrain into an immovable obstacle. With that being said, let’s get into more detail, including five more best disc golf courses in Maryland. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses in Maryland

Some of these courses have some nice elevation changes as well. When it comes to open and wooded play, elevation change rarely gets its due. It often determines whether or not you need to throw a laser or use some finesse with high glide numbers. Some of these courses make very good use of that. 

Seneca Creek State Park – Gaithersburg (Best Overall)

Features

  • 27 holes
  • 8,012’ to 9,685’ course length
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Mach III baskets
  • Course play requires payment

Though Seneca Hills is often mentioned as a “rolling hills” course, the elevation changes are moderate and work well with the course design. It’s a primarily wooded course, so you’ll stick with mid-ranges and putters throughout the majority of the course. 

The best part about the course is it easily tops the list in terms of forcing players to be versatile with their throws. Several baskets simply cannot be approached with a lazy hyzer or anhyzer. You’ll need to be on your best game, firing tight-lined tosses for the majority of the course. 

Turkey Hill DGC – La Plata (Runner Up)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • x6 water hazards
  • 4,594’ to 6,879’ course length
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur baskets

Turkey Hill is a course made for veterans of the sport while remaining attractive for new players in the game. They did an outstanding job providing players with two options on each hole without it just being a matter of moving the pro tee pad back some. 

The course is a good mix of light woods and open shots before it dives into heavy woods, forcing players to get creative. You might be able to get away with a few of the same discs for the first half, but the second half (more like a third) requires a bit more out of your bag.

Woodsboro Regional Park – Woodsboro (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 3,777’ to 6,56’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Gravel tee boxes
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Extreme elevation changes

Not only is this a heavily wooded course, but you also have to contend with strong elevation changes throughout. Keep the disc up and keep it in a tight line, and you’ll do just fine. It’s not the most brutally difficult course in the world, far from it, but it’s not the best choice for your first-ever game of disc golf. 

For skilled players, it’s a fantastic challenge; fortunately, each of the holes features multiple pin placements and multiple tee pads, so beginners aren’t completely out of luck. Bring your hiking boots to this one. It’s practically on the side of a mountain (at least it feels that way), and there is a significant amount of steep, uphill walking/climbing.

Kinder Farm Park – Millersville

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Mach V baskets
  • Mixed tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Course play requires payment
  • Moderate elevation changes

Even though the elevation changes here are moderate, they certainly aren’t “kinder” on newer players and those unfamiliar with playing against and with elevation. There are several throws, both uphill and downhill.

As a moderately wooded course, you’ll experience the occasional tree that swats that “too-wide” throw. However, there are some open holes to help you get that bogey back as well. As a whole, it’s the perfect park for improving your game and confronting a challenge as a new player. 

Mill Brook DGC – Churchville

Features

  • x8 water hazards
  • 18 holes
  • 4,274’ to 6,734’ course length 
  • 36 baskets
  • Chainstar baskets
  • Rubber tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads

Mill Brook is fantastically fun to play, and the number of pins versus tee pads means you can play the course multiple times in a different way each time. About ⅔ of the course is wooded play, but it does open up for some grip-it-and-rip-it throws as well. 

It’s also a well-maintained course, so you won’t have to worry about losing a disc in the rough when a tree smacks your disc down. There is a stream that winds its way through the course as well, so be prepared to get your ankles and calves wet on eight of the eighteen holes.

Druid Hill Legacy – Baltimore

Features

  • 5,855’ to 6,646’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • Mach V baskets
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads

Druid Hill Legacy is not a pushover course, but it’s definitely the most beginner-friendly course on the list. It’s lightly wooded with several open shots. While you’ll have to contend with trees and moderate elevation changes, it’s far from a brutal fight from hole one to hole 18. 

As a park in Baltimore, it is highly maintained and has two layouts (one more difficult than the other). The pin locations aren’t permanent, and the course owners will move the baskets from time to time. If you need a break from city life, it’s a nice little slice of country for some disc golf escapism. 

Ditto Farms – Hagerstown

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 4 layouts for each hole
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • Heavily wooded

Ditto Farms may take a couple of play-throughs to grasp the whole of the course’s concept. It’s heavily wooded, so you won’t understand the whole layout in terms of four different options at each hole on your first run. 

That doesn’t make it a bad course—exactly the opposite. It’s a fantastic course and an even better challenge. It’s easy to navigate as well, and once you have multiple layouts on each hole memorized, you will have a new experience almost every playthrough.

Scarboro Hills – Street

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 4,241’ to 6,150’ course length
  • A single water hazard
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Rubber tee boxes
  • Mach III baskets
  • Extreme elevation changes

Last but not least, we have Scarboro Hills. It’s a rare course that finds a way to create open holes that are challenging. Scarboro Hills does just that with the use of elevation changes throughout. Newbies and veterans alike can take advantage of the multiple pins and tee pads for unique playthroughs each time. 

Bring some low-glade lasers and high-glide floaters with you since the course takes advantage of uphill and downhill shots. It’s not frequently windy here, but even a light breeze changes the dynamic on open, elevated shots to a large degree. 

Final Putt

There you have it, the best disc golf courses in Maryland. I tried to include a good variety of beginner and veteran courses, along with some courses I feel use the topography well. Maryland is a beautiful state as well, and that’s something you’ll notice right off the first tee box. 

Maryland may not be the most envious state in terms of fantastic disc golf courses, but there are some significant gems here, including all eight on this list. You should also check out Washington County Regional Park, Brantwood DGC, and Patapsco Valley State Park for additional, excellent disc golfing experiences. 

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