Minnesota’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Up Your Game in the North Star State

Many of the best disc golf courses in Minnesota are heavily condensed, in and around the Twin Cities, making Minnesota fairly unique as the #6 ranked state for the game of disc golf. Fortunately for me, there are still plenty of outstanding alternatives well outside of Minneapolis and Saint Paul. 

I do my best to keep things fairly spread out, targeting some of the best disc golf courses that are highly rated by the locals but not so much on a website or two. I also place an emphasis on the strategic value of the course, rather than it being near a highly populated area and pretty to look at (though the latter is always a huge draw). 

Minnesota is a beautiful state, beyond a doubt. However, a beautiful course does not make a great course. Minnesota is ranked 6th in the US because it has some of the most outstanding courses in the world. I’ve done my best to gather 8 of them for you without focusing on density within a geographic area. 

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses in Minnesota

Interestingly, Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, are known for their brutal winter season, which is anything but the best of disc golf weather. Disc golfers refused to let that stop them, however, and the Twin Cities are now often referred to as the “disc golf epicenter.” The Twin Cities are thought of as the third best in terms of metro disc golf areas throughout the U.S. 

They don’t exactly make it easy on disc golf enthusiasts like myself, who take the time to tally up the best and worst of a disc golf course and assign it a place in the echelon of course rankings. 

  1. Blue Ribbon Pines – East Bethel (Best Overall)
  2. Kaposia Park – St. Paul (Runner-Up)
  3. Lakewood Hills – White Bear Lake (Best Challenge)

Only Kaposia Park made the Twin Cities’ top three. However, there is more to come, as I have put together a list of 8. Minneapolis will get some love as well. As the third-ranked state in the country, with nearly 400 courses to choose from, there are a ton of fantastic options. I feel like these eight represent some of the best that Minnesota has to offer. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses in Minnesota

If you’re from the deep south or in areas throughout the southwest where snow is uncommon, you might be surprised to know that Minnesotans continue playing right through the winter months. 

As you can imagine, the courses on this list include dual versions of themselves, as playing in the snow is entirely different, especially when it comes to disc selection (bright colors!) and looking for your discs in a white-capped wilderness. 

Blue Ribbon Pines – East Bethel (Best Overall)

Features

  • 8,800’ course length
  • x10 water hazards
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Prodigy baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads

Though there are only single pads and single pins throughout Blue Ribbon Pines, it features 27 holes, with a variety of layouts, depending on where you start. There are ten water hazards across the course, which is a sizeable one. 

Several water hazards guard the approach to the basket, which creates a sense of wariness that must be overcome either off the tee or on the approach shot. The course is outstanding on its own, but it’s also surrounded by amenities, such as a driving range net, practice baskets, and a pro shop.

Kaposia Park – St. Paul (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 8,300’ to 9,600’ course length
  • x2 water hazards
  • Pay to play
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Prodigy baskets

Kaposia Park is the second of the best disc golf courses in Minnesota to utilize Prodigy baskets. But that’s not a bad thing. Though they rarely show up on my lists, they are quite good. Like Blue Ribbon Pines, there is a pro shop on-site in case you’re in need of some new plastics

Kaposia is not brutally difficult, but it is a good mix of wooded and open holes that will burn you if you let them. The elevation changes throughout the course are moderate but incorporated well. Though there are more wooded than open holes, you’ll have enough opportunity to air some of your shots out

Lakewood Hills – White Bear Lake (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 4,900’ to 5,900’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Chainstar baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads

Lakewood Hills is a tough nut to crack, especially for beginners. While it isn’t the most difficult course out of all the lists I’ve written, it deserves to be in this spot amongst Minnesota’s finest disc golf courses. 

The thick woods is the biggest negative factor. Not that it’s unfair, just that it’s tough for a newbie to break into the game in this environment. However, couple that with some very long holes, including a 600’+, mostly in the woods, and it gets tough. Also, from the very start, you have to carry your shot over the water on hole #1. 

Bryant Lake Park – Eden Prairie

Features

  • 3,600’ to 6,000’ course length
  • x2 water hazards
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads

Despite the park’s namesake, there isn’t much in the way of water hazards — just two that are avoidable. Prepare yourself for a number of technical throws, as Bryant Lake requires a degree of precision and forethought on several holes. 

Fortunately, the tee boxes are quite large, with a traditionally concrete center surrounded by pavers for an overall pleasing aesthetic. The best part about the course is the wide variety. With multiple pins and pads, you can play this course five or six times and find something brand new in the next go-round.

Gamehaven – Rochester

Features

  • Two parks
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • 7,800’ course length
  • Concrete tee pads
  • T-2 Prodigy baskets

While the elevation changes throughout the course are modest, there are a ton of them, and you’ll find yourself playing a game of ups and downs, quite literally. Fortunately, it’s a great course for novices of the game, with a lot of open shots and a few trees to block the way…for now. 

The reason being is the trees are still pretty young, planted recently, and will take some time to grow into disc-slapping animals of wood and hate. You can also turn the entire experience from an 18-hole course into a 27-hole course, with the additional 9-hole course on site as well. 

  1. Airborn Disc Golf Preserve – Clearwater: Black Bear

Features

  • 18 holes with 5 layouts
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Turf tee pads
  • T-2 Prodigy baskets
  • Moderate woods

Black Bear is one of four courses to play at Airborn, including the Lynx, Timberwolf, and Red Fox. All four are nationally known and are incredibly challenging courses. The overall aesthetic is gorgeous, with a solid mix of lightly wooded and open shots to make your way through.

The turf tees may not be up to snuff for some, but the tees and the course are well taken care of. The best part about Black Bear is that it’s equally as good as the other three, and all three are within a short walk of each other. Airborn is an excellent place to spend the entire day slinging plastic. 

Riverside Park – St. Cloud

Features

  • 4,800’ to 6,300’ course length
  • Substantial elevation changes
  • Single pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Mach III baskets

Riverside Park is a beautiful disc golf course in St. Cloud, Minnesota, and features a lot of that rolling hill kind of landscape many disc golfers love (some don’t, but, hey, nothing is perfect for everyone). Multiple pin placements throughout give the course plenty of variety. 

The views of the nearby river are scenic and distracting, and there are a lot of reasons to bring out your high-speed drivers and fling gargantuan s-curves across the rolling countryside. It’s one of the more difficult courses to navigate, so here’s to hoping better signage is on the docket. 

Bethel University – Arden Hills

Features

  • 5,300’ to 6,400’ course length
  • x3 water hazards
  • Mixed tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Prodigy baskets
  • Moderately wooded

Last but not least, we have Bethel University, which is almost always on the top ten lists. While I’m always trying to flip over the status quo, Bethel University deserves the positioning. It’s a fantastic little course and well worth the stop if you’re just passing through the area.

This is a complex course with plenty of different shot types, including wooded, open, technical, and bombers. The signage is great, and you never have to worry about being lost. I don’t know what it is about Bethel, but the overwhelming urge to do another run-through follows every game, even if it was a rough one. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Minnesota

The best disc golf courses in Minnesota are far more numerous than what I’ve written about here. However, I can either cover a novel’s worth of content or do my best to narrow down the field and give you something to think about if you’re in the area. 

Minnesota is already a beautiful state, so to have some of the best disc golf courses in the country makes it an enviable one for disc golfers of every stripe. If you live in Minnesota, you know what’s up. For those just visiting, don’t hesitate to stop by one of these courses, especially if it’s snowing. 

If you’re like me and from the state of Florida, there are never enough opportunities to play in the snow. After all, it changes the entire dynamic, and that’s never a bad thing!

2 thoughts on “Minnesota’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Up Your Game in the North Star State”

  1. Hi,
    Have you played the new 18 hole disc golf course Breezy Overlook in Breezy Point Minnesota? It’s next to the Breezy DGC that has been around for 8+ years. I’m on Park and Rec and wanted to let you know our 36 holes are here and the new course has a 4.7 rating on UDisc. You can read reviews there. It’s very unique, in the woods, plenty of elevation. We are having a naming contest for the front and back nine, the main kiosk is not up yet but everything else is and with this warm, non snowy winter, it’s being played. Would love to know your opinion after you give it a go!
    PS it’s sometimes listed as Pequot Lakes rather than Breezy Point we share the post office and zip code.

    Reply
    • Hey Gail, we have not made it up that way but thank you for letting us know about it, we will definitely check it out when we’re in the area!

      Reply

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