Missouri’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Unveiling the Show-Me State’s Top Destinations

The best disc golf courses in Missouri are a dime a dozen, with nearly 300 courses throughout the state and a 13th place ranking in best states for disc golf. Over half of Missouri’s disc golf courses have 18 holes or more, and roughly 60 of them are ranked. 

Missouri, like some other top disc golf states, has hundreds of disc golf clubs and over 200 leagues throughout the state. 

One of the best features of the Show-Me state is the 50+ physical disc golf stores. While purchasing plastic online has its benefits, there’s nothing like being able to pick up a disc and get a feel for the plastic prior to purchase. 

If you’re looking into league play or just getting involved in disc golf for the first time, the choices are numerous, and it’s one of the best states for getting started. 

Missouri is also a beautiful state, and the best courses throughout are a reflection of that, along with fantastic course design, plenty of amenities, and enough challenges for beginners to veterans. 

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses in Missouri

Some of the top courses in the state are separated from one another by a hair. It’s really difficult parsing through the subtle dynamics that elevate one course over the other. Missouri residents agree, with most of the top 50 courses receiving four stars or higher out of five. 

You have to dig deep to find some of the lower-tier courses that are better for casual play rather than professional play and frequent league play. Even then, the courses that don’t make the list are still a lot of fun, especially if you’re new to the game. 

  1. Harmony Bends DGC – Columbia (Best Overall)
  2. Eagle’s Crossing – Hawk Point (Runner-Up)
  3. Columbia Park DGC – Columbia (Best Challenge)

Columbia Park doesn’t sit in the top ten of the best disc golf courses in Missouri. However, it’s one of the more respected courses in the area due to the challenge it offers veteran and amateur players alike. The most challenging courses, at least in my estimation, are not always the most elite courses.

Harmony Bends and Eagle’s Crossing are very impressive courses, well-known within the state and outside of it. They consistently rank in the top 5 and often pop up in the top 10 discussions for the U.S. as a whole. The things that separate them are probably more personal preferences than anything else. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses in Missouri

With that being said, I think you’ll love the choices I have for you today. These are not just disc golf courses but a whole experience and worth spending a day in Columbia or Hawk Point. If you live in Missouri or are passing through, you should definitely check them out and see what all the hype is about. 

Harmony Bends DGC – Columbia (Best Overall)

Features

  • 6,100’ to 9,200’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x6 water hazards
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Extreme elevation changes

This is probably one of the prettiest disc golf courses in the southeastern United States. It’s well-maintained and has some of the best; well taken-care of equipment (baskets, pads, signage, etc.). It’s also one of the most diverse, with each hole being fundamentally different from the last.

This presents a bit of a challenge on its own, especially for those mastering one aspect of their game while struggling with another. However, this course will prepare beginners for all of the above while honing veteran player’s play styles. The fairways are fair but challenging, requiring some finesse occasionally and brute force on others. 

Eagle’s Crossing – Hawk Point (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 7,200’ to 11,300’ course length
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • 18 holes
  • x10 water hazards
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Gateway Titan baskets
  • Pay-to-play
  • Private course

Honestly, you could flip Eagle’s Crossing and Harmony Bends DGC, and it would be perfectly fine. The two courses are so close together that it hardly makes a difference. Eagle’s Crossing is worth experiencing over and over again because you can play the course in so many ways. 

With multiple pin locations and multiple tee pads, no single hole has to be played the same the next time around. If there is one thing that places Eagle’s Crossing below Harmony, it’s the out-of-the-way location of the course. It makes up for it, however, with an incredible pro shop, outstanding baskets, and a ton of variety that accommodates every play style.

Columbia Park DGC – Columbia (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 5,200’ to 6,200’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x4 water hazards
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

Columbia Park DGC is a complicated course. Not because it’s not well-laid-out (because it definitely is) but because you can tell that someone came up with a brilliantly diabolical but somehow fair course design. Then they laid it out, and the result was Columbia Park.

Tree obstacles are fair, but they can make that smooth transition from launch to approach an exercise in madness. You’ll probably come up with names for these megalomaniacal, wooden earth beings. They won’t care. They’ll slap your discs down anyway, and you’ll hear their laughter in the wind. Overall, it’s a fantastic course with a sometimes punishing degree of obstacle avoidance. 

Hanna Hills DGC – Laquey

Features

  • 6,600’ course length
  • X18 holes
  • x5 water hazards
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Monkey Trap baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Private course

Hanna Hills rivals Eagle’s Crossing in terms of variety across the course. This is achieved despite the fact that there are no pro and amateur tees and only a single basket at each hole. The diversity comes in the form of shot types. 

You’ll fight elevation, make ace runs, deal with water hazards, carve tight lines, and grip and rip it. All in a single, 18-hole course that has multiples of all of the above. The signage is excellent, so course navigation is a breeze. You’ll memorize this course quickly because you’ll be drawn to it again and again. 

Bad Rock Creek – Liberty

Features

  • 3,500’ to 7,700’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x6 water hazards
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

In case you haven’t noticed at this point, all the best disc golf courses in Missouri have a ton of water hazards. In this case, there are six, all of which boil down to three ponds that touch six holes. They aren’t brutal, but you will have to pay attention to your throws and avoid slipping the disc out a little too early or late. 

As is also the case with most of the top courses, Bad Rock Creek is a highly diverse course, with a number of different shot types throughout. The signage is also exceptional, so course navigation is never a concern. 

Water Works Park – Kansas City

Features

  • 5,200’ to 6,600’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Mach X baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Single tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations

Another highly diverse disc golf course, Water Works Park, is also free to play, which is always a good thing when heading out to professional-level disc golf courses. Expect a good mix of tight lines in the woods and huge grip-it-and-rip-it throws across the wide-open landscape. 

Water Works Park has a bit of everything on a well-maintained and well-loved course, especially in the local area of Kansas City. The elevation changes throw a wrench in the works as well, forcing you to rethink your throws, regardless of heavily wooded or wide open terrain. 

Grubaugh Park – Ozark

Features

  • 4,500’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Moderate woods and elevation changes
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Mach I baskets

Grubaugh Park is short and sweet but by no means boring and easy. They managed to pack a lot of things that make disc golfers happy into a very small package. Though it’s a difficult course, It’s not immensely difficult, and even the average player will experience the heart-stopping nearness of an ace run

Though the elevation changes aren’t as intense as some of the other courses on this list, the ones that are here are utilized well. Some discs with extra glide and those with low glide numbers will both suit you well out here. The only drawback is that the course is over with before you know it. 

Sioux Passage Park (Original) – St. Louis

Features

  • 6,400’ course length
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • 18 holes
  • Light woods
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Mach III baskets

There are two disc golf courses in Sioux Passage Park, and the original is the best, despite being built way back in the mid-1990s. The original park also has a degree of challenge that Briscoe (the second, newer park) lacks. Expect a lot of tight lines in the early rounds, with a more open experience on the back end. 

However, just because it opens up doesn’t mean things become simpler. The back half features open terrain with the aforementioned extreme elevation changes, amping up the challenge by throwing a new beast at you once you emerge from the woods. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Missouri 

While there’s a big 13 next to the state’s ranking in the world of disc golf, Missouri is, beyond a doubt, one of the top disc golf destinations in the country. All eight of the courses on this list more than represent that claim. These courses are fantastic, and reviewing them revealed a glaring issue.

That issue is that the degree of separation is often so tight that it boils down to the flip of a coin. No, I didn’t flip a coin when compiling this list of the best disc golf courses in Missouri. 

However, it was a difficult list to make. Hopefully, you’ll get to enjoy the incredible features these courses have to offer yourself, and you’ll see exactly what I mean. 

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