Nevada’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Unleash Your Disc Golf Skills in the Silver State

You don’t have to look far to find the best disc golf courses in Nevada since there are only 36 of them. Half of those have at least 18 or more holes throughout the course. As the 7th largest state in the US, disc golf courses are few and far between in the Silver State. 

Of course, that makes my job a lot easier, though disc golfers living in Nevada would probably appreciate a more enthusiastic growth rate of the sport. The good news is that the courses that made my list are fantastic choices, featuring plenty of variety, challenging shots, and incredible views. 

However, if you’re looking for the best of the best, you may have to travel a little ways to get there. Nevada is the 47th-ranked disc golf state in the country, mostly because of the tiny number of courses. “Quality over quantity,” as the saying goes, and, I think you’ll find that the quality of these courses is definitely on the level. 

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses in Nevada

All the disc golf courses in Nevada (or, very nearly all) are concentrated in two sections of the state. The first is in the west, near Douglas, Lyon, and Storey. The second is in the southern tip of the state, in or around Las Vegas and south of Clark. 

There are only two prominent disc golf courses not in these areas—Harvey Park DGC and Ward Mountain DGC, in Tonopah and south of Ruth, respectively. That’s it. Unless you live in the Midwest of the state, close to the border, or near Las Vegas, you’ll have to travel for some disc golf action. Knowing this, I chose my top 8, mostly within those areas.

  1. Stadium Course at Carson Ridge – Carson City (Best Overall)
  2. Zephyr Cove Park – Zephyr Cove (Best Runner-Up)
  3. Reno Adventure Park “Red” – Reno (Best Challenge)

Just to alleviate any confusion, the “red” course at Reno Adventure Park is called, Tom Cliff’s Top Course. Most people just refer to it by its color label, rather than the actual name. Reno Adventure Park isn’t in the top three best disc golf courses in Nevada, though it’s often highly rated. 

However, I won’t shoehorn a course into the third spot (the challenging spot) just because I have to keep the best three consistent with top three lists. In fact, I came very close to listing Kirkwood as the number three spot. It’s located in California, but accessible from the Lake Tahoe side of Nevada. The point is, I take it seriously enough to stay as accurate as possible. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses in Nevada

For the disc golfers in Nevada, you’re probably fairly familiar with most of the courses on this list. For those traveling to the state or just passing through, you don’t want to miss the Midwest side and southern tip, even if you aren’t traveling south to Las Vegas. 

There’s also some good news for those hoping more disc golf courses come to the area. There are a lot more than I anticipated that are brand new, which means they didn’t make the list. I haven’t seen enough of them to make a decision. The fact is, the sport is growing, even in Nevada, and that’s excellent news. 

Stadium Course at Carson Ridge – Carson Ridge (Best Overall)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 4,700’ to 9,500’
  • Single tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Dynamic Veteran baskets
  • Aggregate tee pads (A bunch of rocks)
  • Extreme elevation changes

Don’t let the “bunch of rocks” sarcasm fool you—the tee pads at Stadium Course are stable. It takes a little getting used to if you have a habit of dragging your foot in a circle when you throw, but it’s something you CAN get used to. This course starts off simple enough, progressing into a thoroughly challenging course. 

It’s also one of those courses that just has an incredible flow and rhythm to it. It’s an up-and-down affair as well, so bring some plastic that glides and throw a few laser beams in there for good measure. Keep an eye out for the signs, since the basket positions are altered frequently.

Zephyr Cove Park – Zephyr Cove (Best Runner-Up)

Features

  • 5,300’ course length
  • Single tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Rubber tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Extreme elevation changes

Though it’s in the runner-up spot, Zephyr Cove is probably the most stunningly beautiful course on the list. You can have the worst day of your life on a disc golf course and still walk away with a sense of appreciation for the view. With that being said, Zephyr Cove is no walk in a pretty park.

Rife with extensive elevation changes, interesting looks and throwing lanes, and tall pines scattered throughout Zephyr Cove is a challenging course. Some holes are long par 3s with more than enough topography obstacles to ruin your game.

Reno Adventure Park “Red” – Reno (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 5,900’ course length
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Generic baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Private Course

The best part about the Red Park at Reno Adventure is that it’s one of three disc golf parks to play. It’s also the toughest by far—not the choice for a warm-up game or for beginners just getting their feet wet for the first time. 

Red is probably the toughest course in the state, though it doesn’t hold a candle to the aforementioned Kirkland. I love the fact that this course is entirely fair. It won’t feel that way, thanks to the brutally accurate requirements the course forces on you. But, it’s fair and well-designed. If you’re not ready for this course, it will make for a miserable experience. 

Lizard Peak Disc Golf Complex at Sun Valley – Reno

Features

  • 27 holes
  • 12,000’ course length
  • Moderate elevation changes and woods
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Terrawals tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads

This is one, massive course. I might have to go back and check, but I do believe this is the largest course I have ever reviewed. Though the elevation changes aren’t extreme (probably a good thing given the size of the course), the rolling topography is integrated into the style and play of the course very well. 

This is an excellent course for those with big arms. For all the real estate the course takes up, the designers didn’t hesitate to cater to the ultra-high-speed drivers in your bag. This is where you break out the DD Sheriff, Legacy Cannon, Innova Katana, and Westside Discs King. 

Mountain Crest – Las Vegas

Features

  • 5,200’ to 5,300’ course length
  • Concrete tee pad
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Walking paths throughout

If you’re new to the game of disc golf, this course should be on your essentials list. It’s mostly a flat course, not too difficult to navigate, and not too lengthy. The course design is outstanding, but it doesn’t feature throws that have to be narrow-line laser beams. 

The trees are fairly sparse on the front 9, so feel free to grip it and rip it. On the back 9, the trees become more of an issue. However, that’s mostly due to walking path foot traffic, with the trees acting more like a shield for passers-by, rather than a detriment to your throwing lane. 

Wildhorse Golf Club – Henderson

Features

  • 10,200’ to 10,400’ course length
  • 23 baskets
  • Grass tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Pay to play

The Wildhorse Golf Club sounds like a traditional golf course as if someone forgot to throw the term “disc” in there somewhere. However, it is indeed a disc golf course and an exceptionally good one at that. It has an odd number of baskets at 23, so those who are sticklers for courses in sets of nine will be a little irritated. 

The course design is excellent, and it’s mostly flat throughout, with sparse trees to interfere with any inaccurate throws. Unfortunately, the latest word on the course is that it’s difficult to navigate, with poor signage. Hopefully, that improves soon, so this hidden gem gets the credit it deserves. 

Sunset Park – Las Vegas

Features

  • 7,600’ to 8,800’ course length
  • 24 holes
  • x1 water hazard
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Mach II baskets
  • Single tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations

With the exception of the lone water hazard, Sunset Park is an excellent beginner course with enough challenge to entertain intermediate players and serve as a good warm-up for advanced disc golfers. 

A huge bonus is the disc golf store right across the road. You aren’t likely to lose discs on this course, but it’s the perfect spot to test out new plastic as soon as you walk out of the shop. With solid signage and plenty of accessibility, this is a great course for those who prefer the “good pass time” aspect of the game.

North Tahoe Lion’s Club – Incline Village

Features

  • 4,600’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Moderate woods and elevation changes
  • Single tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Rubber tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

Since I couldn’t technically slide the Kirkland course across Lake Tahoe in here, I went with North Tahoe Lion’s Club instead. This is an exceptional little course, and probably a little more tree-heavy than advertised. Fortunately, it’s not a tree Mecca, and only errant throws will turn into plastic tacos

The only drawbacks are the complete lack of par 4s and occasional issues with signage. Otherwise, you’ll find a solid level of challenge here, with excellent design decisions throughout. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Nevada

It’s really a shame that there aren’t more disc golf courses throughout the state of Nevada. Signs are good that more are coming, but that’s mostly an unknowable feature. The best disc golf courses in Nevada congregate heavily in only two, specific areas, leaving disc golfers and prospective disc golfers without a course of their own. 

The good news is, what’s here is pretty good by national disc golf course standards. You’ll find plenty of variety, extreme challenges, beginner-friendly options, and some fantastic intermediate courses in the Silver State. You just have to travel a ways to reach them.

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