New Hampshire’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Unleash Your Disc Golfing Skills

With 21 ranked courses and more than 60 courses across the 5th smallest state in the US, the best disc golf courses in New Hampshire really stand out. The great thing about living in a state the size of New Hampshire is that any disc golf course you want to play is probably fairly close.

After all, you can travel through the longest stretch of New Hampshire in about 4 hours. Even better, the 21 ranked disc golf courses in the state are fairly spread out, making the best the sport has to offer readily available for New Hampshire residents and those coming in from bordering states. 

That’s the kind of thing that makes this list much more enjoyable for those who live in The Granite State. Imagine living in South Texas and finding out that the best course in the state is Wichita Falls or something. In New Hampshire, no matter where you stay, you have access to the best courses on this list!

My Picks for the Best Disc Golf Courses in New Hampshire

Every disc golfer has their favorites, but the cream always rises to the top, no matter what you throw in the mix. For such a small state, the topography in New Hampshire varies, with sea level flat land along most of the Atlantic coastline and the more mountainous regions reserved for the north of the state. 

In between the two, there are plenty of rolling hills and rivers to make things interesting. I love the great outdoors, and I love a course that takes full advantage of the local topography, especially if it’s a challenging course without the gimmicky obstacles that don’t belong. 

  1. Top O’The Hill – Canterbury (Best Overall)
  2. The Hollows DGC North (Runner-Up)
  3. Woods at Beauty Hill Lynx – Barnstead (Best Challenge)

When I say “gimmicky,” that’s exactly what I mean. There’s a difference between a narrow, tight fairway flanked by oak or evergreen sentinels and a fairway with a tree right in the middle of the fairway. Okay, what is it? Two fairways? The one that starts before the tree and the one that starts after? 

I hate that mess because it suggests a serious design flaw, leaving a tree in the middle of the fairway because of reasons, that’s why. I appreciate a well-designed course, and though I’m not perfect in all of my choices, I do my best to stick to this mantra.

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses in New Hampshire

The disc golf courses on this list are the best The Granite State has to offer because of how well they’re designed. They give newcomers a refreshing drive to learn the game and advance their skills. Hit up a few of the courses on this list, and you’ll find yourself building a plastics collection in no time. 

It certainly helps that New Hampshire has some gorgeous scenery. A part of what drives the exceptional growth in the sport is the engagement with nature the game offers. Regular golf is a series of rolling hills, while disc golf offers something new to take in around every corner. With that being said, here is my list of the top 8, all of which contain fantastic course design, offer a lot of fun, and are great to look at!

Top O’The Hill – Canterbury (Best Overall)

Features

  • 2,700’ to 6,500’ course length
  • Rubber tee pads
  • Chainstar baskets
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Private course
  • Pay-to-play

Top O’The Hill is one of those courses that makes newbies fall in love with the sport from the first drive off the first tee. It’s an approachable course at any player level, thanks to the amateur, intermediate, and professional tee pad locations, along with multiple pins throughout. 

As a mostly wooded course, it can be punishing, especially for new players. However, it’s not the densest wood course in the world. You’ll find that even the professional holes leave a little space for error. 

The Hollows DGC North (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 4,400’ to 6,500’ course length
  • x6 water hazards
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Dynamic Veteran baskets
  • Public Course
  • Designed by Eric McCabe

I mention Eric McCabe because, as most intermediate and pro disc golf players know, he’s a professional sponsored by Dynamic Discs from the Trilogy lineup. As a professional disc golfer, he knows what makes a course tick, and he accomplished just that at The Hollows DGC. 

There are 6 water hazards in play, and is a mostly wooded course. However, it never feels cheap. The design is thorough, challenging, and fair to both newcomers and veterans of the game. The best part is, if you get bored with playing the North course, there is a South Course on site as well. 

Woods at Beauty Hill Lynx – Barnstead (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 3,100’ to 6,100’ course length
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Brick tee pads
  • Private course
  • Pay-to-play

The Woods at Beauty Hill Lynx is a tough little nut to crack. If you prefer something a little easier, it’s not the only course on site, either. If it featured moderate elevation changes or moderate tree density alone, it probably wouldn’t be a very tough course. 

However, throwing up and downhill changes your perspective on everything, and a bunch of trees everywhere makes it that much worse. It’s not the most brutal course I’ve ever listed as the “best challenge,” but it’s the most difficult of this bunch. It’s also one of those unique courses that ramps up the difficulty without sinking the fun factor. 

White Mountain – Campton

Features

  • 4,200’ to 5,100’ course length
  • 9-hole course
  • Mach V Baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • A mixture of tee pad types
  • Heavy woods
  • Extreme elevation changes

The only reason this one didn’t make the most challenging course is because it’s only half a course. In fact, I would have to go back and check, but I don’t think I’ve ever placed a 9-hole course on any of my lists before. However, this one merits a position because of its challenge, popularity, and the incredible surrounding scenery.

This is a beautiful little course located on a chunk of land that’s all ups and downs. It will really challenge your ability to choose the right plastics and make you pay more attention to those glide, fade, and turn numbers, all of which will heavily influence your success here. 

Squamanagonic DGC – Rochester

Features

  • 6,400’ course length
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Densely wooded
  • Chainstar baskets
  • Rubber tee pads
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations

Squamanagonic is another tough one, and not because it’s difficult to pronounce. Heavy woods and steeply rolling hills will challenge your form, as well as your ability to gauge the right plastic for the job (without turning it into a taco against the nearest tree). 

It’s a beautiful little location as well, and it even has a small brook running through it, though this isn’t a water hazard. The fairways are tight, and you will have to carve your lines very well, lest a random tree branch slaps your disc out of the air on an otherwise perfect throw. 

Salmon Falls – Rochester

Features

  • 5,000’ to 7,200’ course length
  • x9 water hazards
  • Mach X baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Gravel tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Pay-to-play

Salmon Falls offers a little bit of something for everyone. There are par 5s and par 4s on the course, along with a healthy dose of play in the woods and elevation changes. It’s far from an overwhelming course, though you can experience a challenge if you want to, thanks to the pro and amateur tee pad choices. 

It’s also one of the most well-maintained courses in the state, and you can tell the owners love and appreciate the sport more than enough to make sure the course is as close to perfection as possible. 

Bellamy Park – Dover

Features

  • 5,700’ course length
  • x8 water hazards
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Mach VII baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Densely wooded
  • Moderate elevation changes

At this point, you should recognize the fact that New Hampshire is the state to go to if you want to find a challenge. Bellamy Park is no exception, and though it’s not the toughest course on the list, it will challenge veterans of the game beyond a doubt. 

The shots throughout this course require laser precision. Knowing your fade and turn numbers and being familiar with your discs will go a long way at Bellamy Park. The equipment is outstanding, with concrete pads and Mach VII baskets, the latter of which aren’t all that common out there. 

Mount Sunapee Resort – Sunapee

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Gravel tee pads
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • DISCatcher baskets

Last on our list of the best disc golf courses in New Hampshire is definitely not the least. Mount Sunapee is a fantastic course that you have to either hike or ride a lift to reach. The views are incredible, and the course is yet another challenge on a list that’s full of them. 

The elevation change is mostly one-way, so you’ll have to get used to the idea of slinging discs at a downward angle, paying attention to those glide numbers and the overall fade. There is a healthy mix of short and long throws, but nothing I would consider worthy of a par 5. The only real con is the $ 10-a-day fee to get yourself in the door. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in New Hampshire

It’s strange how these states get their rankings, especially considering the fact that the best disc golf courses in New Hampshire belong in the same conversation as some higher-ranking states. These are phenomenal and challenging courses. Some of them are brutally challenging while retaining fairness and lacking gimmicky fairway features.

It probably has more to do with the number of disc golf courses. Quantity over quality, in other words. In my opinion, New Hampshire has some outstanding courses that easily hold their own, with some of the best in the country.

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