New Jersey’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Finding A New Challenge In The Garden State

You don’t have to look far and wide to find the best disc golf courses in New Jersey. As the fourth-smallest state in the U.S., with 74 courses, 21 ranked courses, and 37 courses with 18 or more holes, there’s a disc golf course around every block. 

However, New Jersey is ranked 41st in terms of the best states for the sport. That means the really exceptional courses are fewer and farther between. New Jersey is a mostly flat state, with only a few areas throughout the state that rise over 100’ above sea level. 

So, there’s no dealing with extreme elevation changes here. Even worse, the state is trying to shut down one of the more popular courses, so they can convert it into a “passive” recreational area. The good news is that there is more than one excellent disc golf course in the Garden State, and we’re here to reveal them all.

My Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In New Jersey

With 74% of New Jersey’s real estate sitting outside of metro areas, that leaves a lot of room for some exceptional disc golf courses. It’s also a good opportunity for splendid design choices since New Jersey is a beautiful state with interesting topography. 

I would normally have placed Stafford Woods in the top three mix. However, with the current ridiculousness going on with the Department of Environmental Protection trying to shut it down for whatever reason, I have to leave it completely off the list. 

  1. Camp Tecumseh – Pittstown (Best Overall)
  2. Greystone Woods – Morris Plains (Runner-Up)
  3. Thompson Park –Jamesburg (Best Challenge)

While I’m not entirely sure if New Jersey got its way in shutting down Stafford Woods yet (it’s been a while since I’ve been up New Jersey’s way), I can’t list it while the question of whether or not it will even exist a week from now is still up in the air. It’s a shame, really. It all seems to have stemmed from a neighbor dispute. 

Either way, that shouldn’t detract from the top three on this list, which are all outstanding courses in their own right, as well as the five that come after. If you’re looking for a challenge, Thompson Park won’t present a straight beat down, but it’s less forgiving for newbies. Camp Tecumseh and Greystone Woods are within a hair of each other and could have gone either way. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses In New Jersey

Now that we’ve ironed out the unfortunate, possible demise of Stafford Woods (the whole situation aggravates me the more I dig into it), the following 8 disc golf courses represent some of the best New Jersey has to offer. That’s saying something since this small state is packed with disc golf courses. 

I cover these like I always do, with a highlight on design features, fair but challenging fairways, and the overall flow and aesthetics of the course. 

Camp Tecumseh –Pittstown (Best Overall)

Features

  • 7,500’ course length
  • x5 water hazards
  • 18 holes
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Mix of tee pad types
  • Private course

If there is one thing that pushes Camp Tecumseh to the forefront of the eight courses on this list, it’s versatility. Camp Tecumseh features a wide variety of shot types throughout, along with moderate elevation changes, water hazards, and moderate tree lines well-incorporated into the entire experience. 

There are a few par 4s sprinkled in for good measure as well. Another great feature is the half-and-half open and wooded shots. It’s always nice not to feel claustrophobic for the entire play-through. There’s also a good deal of strategy and finesse involved as well, which is always welcome. 

Greystone Woods – Morris Plains (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 5,400’ to 7,800’ course length
  • x8 water hazards
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Mix of tee pad types
  • Single pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • 18 baskets

Eight water hazards will keep amateur to advanced players on their toes. Most of them are in the center of the course, with a few more scattered throughout the back nine. The inclusion of pro and amateur tee pads keeps this from being a brutally challenging course. 

Another good thing Greystone embraces is amping up the intensity from a simple start. As you play, levels of shot types, challenges, and finesse shots increase in difficulty. It’s also one of the prettiest courses on this list, and, even if you have a bad day, you’ll still enjoy the scenery. 

Thompson Park – Jamesburg (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 6,500’ to 7,900’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x2 water hazards
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Mach V baskets
  • Rubber tee pads

Thompson Park has it all, which is part of what makes it a fairly challenging course. Is it the most brutal course in the county? Not by a long shot. But, it’s one of the more challenging courses in New Jersey, for sure. 

Moderate elevation changes, tight throwing lanes, open distance shots, and plenty of shot-shaping abound. Fortunately, the existence of white tees (amateur) gives new players a breather. You know, when making the jump from amateur to pro tees adds nearly 1,500’ to the course, those pros won’t be easy. 

Doc Cramer DGC – Manahawkin

Features

  • 6,000’ course length
  • Heavy woods
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Pavers and rubber tee pads
  • Chainstar baskets
  • Single pin locations

Doc Cramer is a fine example of a disc golf course that gets finer with age. This course takes an interesting approach to the advanced versus amateur tees, including pavers for the pro boxes and leaving the amateurs with rubber tee pads. Say what you want about the methodology; it seems to me like a heck of an incentive to get better and move up. 

Though it’s not as balanced as the top three, it does have some open shots mixed into a mostly wooded course. It’s well-maintained, however, so you shouldn’t ding yourself scrambling through the thickets looking for a lost disc. 

Allaire State Park – Wall Township

Features

  • 5,800’ course length
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Dynamic Veteran baskets
  • Pavers tee pads
  • Heavy woods

Though it’s a mid-size course, it feels a lot longer, thanks to the heavy woods. That also means you’ll spend most of your day with mid-ranges, fairway drivers, and putters. You’ll need to carve some tight lines on some, while others offer a little relief in terms of wider fairways. 

It even includes a par 5, which is a rare commodity in a heavily wooded environment. One of the best things you can do on heavily wooded courses with hard-angle doglegs is to bring the highly overstable mid-ranges along for the ride. If it has a heavy fade, it should probably go in the bag. 

Alcyon Woods – Pitman

Features

  • 5,200’ to 6,700’ course length
  • Heavily wooded
  • 18 holes
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Pavers tee pads
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations

As a mostly flat area of New Jersey, Alcyon Woods is a fine example of making the best of what you have. This course manages to carve some fine fairways over and down moderate elevation changes, which isn’t something you see in the area very much. 

As a heavily wooded course, it may come with a bit of shock to the big arms out there that play extensively on open courses. The biggest knock against this course is some fairways allow for narrow trees in the fairway. I’ve always thought this was ridiculous and a cheap way of increasing difficulty by making the fairway into a perfect or nothing shot. 

Oak Ridge Park – Clark

Features

  • 5,100’ to 7,200’ course length
  • Light woods/open
  • Natural tee pads
  • DiscGolfPark Pro baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations

Oak Ridge Park is a solid example of what a disc golf course designer can do with an old golf course. While elevation changes are less than moderate, you can tell that the course designers used what little there is to great advantage. In fact, most of the holes feature some degree of elevation change.

It’s not heavily wooded, with just enough trees to give you a bad day if you’re really off target once or twice. If you’re off more than that, maybe it’s just not your day. It also includes excellent signage, containing satellite imagery combined with easy-to-read markings.

Ocean County Park – Lakewood

Features

  • 6,200’ course length
  • x2 water hazards
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations

Last, but not least, we have Ocean County Park in Lakewood, New Jersey. I try to include a more laid-back, beginner-friendly course in every set of eight, and Ocean County Park mostly fits the bill. It’s in a park, after all, so you can’t go too gung-ho about slinging discs one way or the other. 

There’s no dealing with heavy underbrush or fighting through thick trees, guarding the baskets like sentinels. You can’t afford to mess up, however, as there are enough trees and other obstacles throughout the course to shake things up. Overall, it’s one of the more peaceful and quiet disc golfing experiences you can have. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in New Jersey

There you have it, the best disc golf courses in New Jersey. While New Jersey isn’t home to the best disc golf courses in the US, there are a lot of them throughout the state and many hidden gems within. 
These courses take excellent advantage of the New Jersey topography, often creating something from not much at all. New Jersey, like Florida, is generally flat, forcing disc golf course designers to think outside the box. Lucky for them, that way of thinking resulted in some great disc golf courses for players, beginners and advanced, to test their skills against.

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