New Mexico’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Holing Out In The Enchantment State

The best disc golf courses in New Mexico are unique, largely thanks to the state’s interesting and unique topography. 

One of the stand-out features of the sport is the utilization of the local topography to create some compelling course designs.

There are only 85 courses in the Enchantment State, 9 of which are ranked. As a growing sport, there are some states where disc golf is still a little behind the curve. 

New Mexico is getting there, however, and there are a handful of excellent courses that are more than worth highlighting here. 

My Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In New Mexico

New Mexico is ranked 39th in the U.S. Not something to brag about. However, the best courses in New Mexico are proof of the potential for the sport. 

In fact, the courses I chose for the list represent the variety of the state’s regions. Why does that matter? Well, imagine only ever playing disc golf on wide-open plains. 

Not just for a single game, either, but always. A huge and underrepresented part of what makes disc golf so popular is course design within visually stunning locations. 

The topography is the true challenge of the sport. You’re always playing against your surroundings, and the best disc golf courses take full advantage of that. 

  1. Cloudcroft Mountain DGC – Cloudcroft (Best Overall)
  2. Lion’s Wilderness – Farmington (Runner-Up)
  3. Moon Mountain DGC – Ruidoso (Best Challenge)

There are eight courses on this list that I feel are the best New Mexico has to offer. However, the above three stand out from the rest. 

This is especially true of Moon Mountain, which includes one of the longest fairways I’ve ever seen. These courses are well-designed, taking full advantage of the surrounding topography.

To me, the stand-out feature of a solid course is one that strategically utilizes the surrounding area without turning it into an obstacle. 

That’s a primary condition for me and if there is a tree sitting in the middle of the fairway, lacking any strategic value whatsoever, the course loses a lot of brownie points with me. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses In New Mexico

My list of the best disc golf courses in New Mexico includes courses that force disc golfers to adhere to a motto I learned in my teens as a U.S. Marine. “Overcome, adapt, and improvise.” 

Some seek out simplicity in a course for casual play. That’s perfectly fine. 

However, casual courses won’t find their way onto the “best of” lists. 

Cloudcroft Mountain DGC – Cloudcroft (Best Overall)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • High tree density
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Rubber tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads

This is a course that truly embraces the idea of using extreme elevation changes in a professional course design. There are elevations here of 9,000’. 

When you’re throwing down, those fade, turn, and glide numbers become so brutal. Mostly, it’s because you’re dealing with a lot of hang time or very little.

In other words, you have to think your way through this course, especially if the wind is really kicking (not uncommon at that elevation). 

Some elevation changes are so extreme that the course designers put in handrails to help you climb. Strap your hiking shoes on and prepare yourself for some serious exercise

Lion’s Wilderness – Farmington (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 27 holes
  • 7,000’ to 7,700-course length
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • Mixed basket types

This is a very unique course. Visually, it’s quintessential New Mexico. Long, sandy views with sporadic boulders spread throughout the course make for some interesting drives. 

Though the tee pads and baskets are a mix of types, they are all well-made and well-maintained. 

It’s a moderately hilly course, which is problematic when matched with the hard pan terrain type. 

Unlike a forest, where the grass, leaves, pine straw, etc., will effectively catch your disc if it glances off the basket, this course will brutalize your inefficiency. 

If you miss, the potential for your disc to roll half a mile down a light hill is very high. 

Good luck!

Moon Mountain DGC – Ruidoso (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • 7,100’ to 8,600’ course length
  • High tree density
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DN Liberty Baskets
  • Single tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations

This is one of the most challenging disc golf courses I’ve ever reviewed. 

The elevation changes are significant, the tree density will taco many a disc, and one of the holes is a 1,300’ blunderbuss of a par 5. 

I have about a 350’ to 400’ range on my drives, and 1,300’ is the longest I’ve ever seen.

I’m certain there are longer ones out there and, on its own, this would just be a stand-out feature. However, the rest of the course is no joke, and it doesn’t get any kinder throughout. 

Designed by Eric McCabe, this course is a challenge for the ages and not the place first-time disc golfers should use to get their feet wet for the first time. 

Sipapu Ski And Summer Resort – Vadito

Features

  • 20 holes
  • 3,721’ to 5,900’ course length
  • x3 water hazards
  • Rubber tee pads
  • Mach III baskets
  • Pro and amateur baskets
  • Single pin locations

After the brutality of Moon Mountain, Sipapu seems like a walk in the park. Don’t let that fool you, however. 

This course is a challenge as well, with plenty of tight, winding corridors up and over various elevation changes is always a challenge. The tree density is fairly heavy throughout, but the fairways are tight and fair. 

Discs like the mid-range Justice, the MVP Deflector, or the Innova Gator will get a lot of use here, especially if you can take advantage of hard dog legs, at short distances, through very tight lanes. 

Sipapu is a challenging but stunning course. However, it’s also a ski resort, which does disrupt the course in the winter.

Grindstone Park – Ruidoso

Features

  • 8,600’ course length
  • 27 holes
  • x5 water hazards
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Extreme elevation changes

Grindstone Park is often at the top of the best disc golf courses in New Mexico lists, and it’s definitely a top 5 course on mine. 

It’s a nice change when it comes to tree density since it’s a little more moderate than other courses on this list. 

The front 9 is relatively clear and beautiful, with the challenge coming from the rolling landscape with fairways drawn strategically around a few trees and a few water hazards. 

The course doesn’t stay simple, though, increasing in difficulty as you go. This is especially true with the elevation changes and tree density throughout the course. 

Brent Baca Memorial – Albuquerque

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 7,800’ course length
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Mixed basket types
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations

Finally, a disc golf course that’s a little more fit for beginners. While first-time disc golfers will get along just fine at Grindstone Park, it still has its more intense moments. 

Brent Baca is mostly flat, with only a few trees here and there. 

The true challenge here is the sage brushes throughout the course. Learning to keep your disc up long enough to clear the tops and drop where it needs to is a challenge. 

The biggest reason this course is as low as sixth is because there are gimmicky, artificial obstructions at the beginning of the course, and I don’t hold well with that type of course design. 

Fortunately, it’s just the first hole. 

Roosevelt Park – Albuquerque

Features

  • 5,100’ to 6,100’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Single tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations

Roosevelt Park takes a bit of everything when it comes to New Mexico topography, mixes it all together, and doesn’t overdo it. Though there are a lot of trees in the area, they never really feel like a threat to your disc. 

This is a great place to air it out with some high-speed drivers and fairway drivers

The multiple pin locations keep things interesting, as you can play the course in multiple ways, depending on your strengths and weaknesses. 

This is one of the more varied courses I’ve seen in a long time, with an effective mix of shot types, terrain, and natural obstacles to work around. 

Arroyo Chamisos – Santa Fe

Features

  • 6,500’ to 7,500’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Mach V baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tees

Out of the eight courses on this list, Arroyo Chamisos is the most varied when it comes to how you play it. With multiple pin locations and multiple tee pads, you can play this course a dozen times and never feel like you’ve had a repetitive couple of games. 

It also allows you to play to your strengths and weaknesses while shifting to more difficult tee boxes as you improve. 

It’s not a brutal course either, with light tree density, a good deal of sagebrush, and minor changes in elevation throughout. 

This is a fantastic course for beginners to elevate their game to the next level. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in New Mexico

This list of eight are the best disc golf courses in New Mexico, and they represent a solid mix of extremely challenging to beginner-friendly. 

While the Enchantment State isn’t going to break any “best disc golf state” lists any time soon, the sport is clearly growing. 

These courses are exactly what the sport needs to expand and continue to grow local disc golf communities.

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