North Dakota’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Flicking Discs in the Flickertail State

The best disc golf courses in North Dakota are few and far between.

I mean that quite literally.

North Dakota is a vast and open expanse of land, with only 0.36 courses for every 1,000 square miles of real estate.

I like to have an optimistic view of things, however.

When courses are few and far between, my job gets a lot easier because it’s easier to identify the best of the best.

Look closely enough and experience the sport long enough, you’ll find what you’re looking for. 

My Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In North Dakota

North Dakota is one of the top states in the country when it comes to agriculture, and it shows.

Mile after mile of open expanse, filled with crops more often than not, with barely a change in elevation as far as the eye can see.

The Red River Valley and the Great Plains make up ⅔ of the state, and they are almost entirely flat.

You have to head to the Turtle Mountains if you want to see elevation changes.

Ranked 38th for the best disc golf state in the US, there are only 85 courses in North Dakota.

Of those 85, only a handful actually have 18 holes.

Fortunately, the handful is large enough to fill a top eight list, if it’s merited, of course.

  1. Iwen Park North – Fargo (Best Overall)
  2. Jamestown Reservoir – Jamestown (Runner-Up)
  3. Patterson Lake DGC – Dickinson (Best Challenge)

Instead of relying on massive elevation changes or navigating difficult terrain, disc golf courses in North Dakota require a higher ingenuity.

Like other flat states, such as Kansas, there are dips and peaks here and there, with trees being the primary boundary factor. 

I love the courses on this list because they do just that. I’ve never been shy about my loathing for gimmicky course designs, with trees in the middle of the fairway serving no other purpose other than to completely obstruct all approaches.

The best courses in North Dakota avoid that while offering a challenging and instructive experience. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses in North Dakota

Disc golf is definitely not mainstream in North Dakota, and perhaps, it never will be. However, that doesn’t mean there’s no love for the sport in the state—quite the opposite.

Love for the sport is the reason for the number of excellent courses in the state, though they are spread out. 

Iwen Park North – Fargo (Best Overall)

Features

  • 7,700’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x4 water hazards
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Variety of baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads

Iwen Park North is one of those “do-it-all” courses with something for everyone. In addition to that, it’s a well-maintained course with excellent shot variety.

As with most courses in North Dakota, it’s mostly flat. However, the course makes good use of the light dips and peaks throughout. 

The distance variety is exceptional as well. I would rate this course as a mid-length simply because I’ve played some brutally long courses.

But, it’s long for most, and it takes advantage of it while also mixing in some good short throws as well.

Its variety and great condition separates it from the pack, along with a fantastic use of the very light elevation changes. 

Jamestown Reservoir – Jamestown (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 10,300’ to 12,700’ course length
  • 24 holes
  • x6 water hazards
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Single tee pads

Honestly, Jamestown would probably be in the number-one spot if it weren’t for the extreme length.

It is a massive course, and be prepared to spend a solid amount of time on it.

As a professional-type course, it is highly technical and not the best starting point for newbies to the game. 

However, even if you are new, Jamestown Reservoir offers a premium example of what the game is all about because you’ll need to break out the whole bag for this course.

This is also a rare course with large elevation changes, and the level of utilization is incredible. Jamestown Reservoir is a beautiful, well-defined course that’s a blast as much as a challenge. 

Patterson Lake DGC – Dickinson (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 7,400’ to 9,300’ course length
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • x2 water hazards
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Pay to play
  • Concrete tee pads

Patterson Lake is a tough-as-nails little disc golf course in Dickinson, North Dakota.

I say “little”, but it’s actually a pretty sizeable course, though not as large as Jamestown Reservoir.

With multiple pin locations and tee pads, you can play this course in a number of ways, simplifying and complicating it as you see fit. 

The great thing about Patterson Lake is it was recently expanded, which shows the course designers care about the course and want to see it continue to succeed.

It’s not an easy course, however, unless you keep it to the close pins and amateur tees. It’s even harder when you consider the cactuses around the area.

Be sure to wear some good boots, and be careful where you throw your discs!

General Sibley Park – Bismarck

Features

  • 4,900’ to 9,200’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Mixed baskets

One thing I really appreciate from a good disc golf course is signage.

Nothing is more frustrating than hitting a brand-new course up and you get lost on hole #7, spending 15 minutes + trying to find #8.

General Sibley Park has great signage and the park is very nice as well. 

Not only that, with the multiple pin locations, you can play this course in a number of ways.

That’s the reason for the huge course length disparity. Short, in this case, equals an easier experience.

This is also one of my top courses in terms of shot diversity. Bring your whole disc arsenal out for this one. 

Oak Grove Park – Fargo

Features

  • 4,900’ to 5,600’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Mach V baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Single tee pads

For a state that isn’t exactly embracing the disc golf scene, Oak Grove Park will surprise you. It’s been there since the early 1980s, something disc golf courses in far more popular areas often can’t claim.

It’s also a solid little course and an excellent jumping-off platform for new players. 

For the most part, the shots are fairly short, though there is a good mix of shorter and longer ones. However, the final hole demands a high-speed driver at over 500’.

Overall, it’s a solid course with plenty of diverse shots. Beginners can play this course for a while, and it will do much to improve their game before stepping up to the next level. 

Lincoln Drive Park – Grand Forks

Features

  • Multiple courses (Regular and The Loop)
  • 5,700’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations

Lincoln Drive Park is a small course with a scattering of trees throughout, which is a good thing for tree-haters. The density is never quite so bad that it ends up fueling your rage and frustration.

The course is well-maintained, with decent signage throughout, so you’re never lost.

As a course on flat land with few trees, it’s often a battle of the player versus the wind.

If you need to work on your game in the wind, this is the place to do it. Lincoln Drive also does a great job of mixing things up, so you’re never bored with the same old, same old.

For those looking for a course with serious, high-speed driver fairways, this course won’t cut it. 

Trollwood Park – Fargo

Features 

  • 5,000’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x5 water hazards
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Frolfware baskets

Trollwood Park is off by itself in an otherwise traditional park setting.

It’s a well-maintained and loved course, however, with plenty of excellent signage and a variety of shot types throughout.

It’s a relatively short course, however, so the shots are never of the grip-it-and-rip-it variety. 

It’s a mostly flat course, though the trees are all the challenge you’ll need.

The course design is well-thought-out, without much in the way of topographical creativity going on.

Bring along some of your more finesse discs and highly overstable midranges to tackle the corners and narrow fairways. 

Klaus Park – Jamestown

Features

  • 4,700’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x5 water hazards
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

Klaus Park rounds out the list of best disc golf courses in North Dakota.

Trees are sporadic, and elevation changes are non-existent.

The course is well-designed, however, using the trees as natural, challenging borders, forcing tight drives and accuracy across the course. 

It’s an excellent course for beginners as well.

Located in the city park, it’s a good way to get out and play disc golf while staying local.

There are a lot of very short holes here, so it may turn off some of the more veteran players who have advanced well beyond pitch and catch throws.

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in North Dakota

The best disc golf courses in North Dakota are few and far between.

It’s hard to blame North Dakota, though, since the state is mostly rural, huge, and heavy on the agricultural side.

There’s no sense in building courses all over the place when no one is around to play or talk about it. 

Fortunately, there are a handful of fine courses sprinkled across the 19th largest state in the U.S.

This is especially true in Fargo, with three of my choices featuring Fargo, North Dakota. If you can make it out to some of these courses, give them a try.

Nothing spreads the sport more than community and participation!

What’s your favorite disc golf course in North Dakota?

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