Best Disc Golf Courses In Norway, The Land Of Midnight

The eight best disc golf courses in Norway featured some steep competition. While the U.S. leads the world in the plastic-flinging sport, Norway isn’t too far behind, sitting in the fifth spot. Of course, that makes plenty of sense, thanks to considerable love for the sport in the Nordic countries. 

Like Finland, Norway can’t compare to the U.S. in terms of sheer number of courses. However, there are nearly two hundred eighteen-hole courses in the Land of Midnight, and it’s time to separate the wheat from the chaff. 

My Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In Norway

One thing is for sure: Norway serves as one of the best backdrops for the sport in the entire world. Winding rivers cut through mountainous landscapes with cascading waterfalls. Tiny towns splash vibrant colors along lazy rivers and reflecting lakes. Rolling countryside gives way to giant towers of natural rock nearly half a billion years old. 

It’s hard to imagine a better place to sling discs, and the terrain offers its own unique challenges, no matter where you’re at. Norway is ranked number five in the best disc golf countries, with over 600 courses. Fortunately, I don’t have to cover all 647 — just the best eight out of the bunch!

  1. Krokhol DGC – Siggerud, Norway (Best Overall)
  2. Øverås Diskgolfpark – Øverås, Norway (Best Challenge)
  3. Stovner DiskGolfPark –  Oslo, Norway (Runner-Up)

Sure, some of the names are difficult to pronounce, but these are some incredible courses with many challenges and attributes that separate them from the pack. For example, Øverås has hole number 15, which was voted the most difficult in the sport in 2022. 

The above three courses are also some of the most well-taken care of and manicured in the game. They look like traditional golf courses, with only the baskets truly giving them away. Like Finland, most of the courses on this list feature a ton of variety, favoring big arms and finesse players alike.

Top 8 Best Disc Golf Courses in Norway

With a mountainous landscape interspersed with rolling hills, white birch, and deciduous trees, Norway is as much a natural challenge as it is a manufactured one. The surrounding eye candy is distracting as well unless you’re a native to the country. If you’re just visiting, it pays to stay focused on the best disc golf courses in Norway. 

Krokhol DGC – Siggerud, Norway (Best Overall)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • x3 water hazards
  • Turf tee pads
  • Latitude 64 Pro baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Free to play
  • Moderate elevation changes

Like many of the courses on this list, and across Norway for that matter, this course features a wide mixture of natural obstacles, with the fairway design taking advantage of all. You’ll find yourself challenged by an uphill throw on one hole, a dense forest on the next, and a spacious fairway on the next. 

Krokhol DGC also features a number of wide-open shots, so be sure to bring your high-speed drivers and some elbow grease for the distance. One of the fun aspects of playing against even minor elevation is the deception factor. You’ll find yourself playing against the illusion of distance quite often on this course, which will make or break you more often than any tree. 

Øverås Diskgolfpark – Øverås, Norway (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 6,400’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads

Øverås is a really fun mix, with most of the course within the woods and enough elevations to bring distance deception into the calculation. What makes this course so difficult is the number of straight shots (or close enough) throughout the wooded holes. Anyone with more than a day of experience in the game will understand how difficult a straight shot through the woods is. 

Not only do you need a disc with a low fade, but you also have to release it just so, often with an anhyzer angle just slight enough to match its fade. This is one of the most difficult throws to master, and one you will have to master if you want to dominate this course. There are also a few wicked doglegs and one of the hardest holes on any course in the world. 

Stovner DiskGolfPark –  Oslo, Norway (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 5,000’ course length
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Mixed tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Moderate elevation changes

Compared to the previous two, Stovner is a neat, clean-cut, straightforward course. At least, it looks that way on paper. While it’s not the most difficult course to tackle, it’s still a lot of fun and an excellent starting point for newcomers to the game. There are a lot of flat, long-distance throws here, so newbies may have to cheat a little and add a par until their techniques are up to the task. 

There are a few holes here and there with some strategically placed fairways in relation to the trees. Moderate elevation changes throughout will always toy with your depth perception, but a few games will get you used to the overall distances. This is one of the rare courses in Norway or Finland that has tee boxes made of something other than turf. 

Ørland DiscGolfPark – Brekstad, Norway

Features

  • 18 Holes
  • Turf tee pads
  • DISCatcher Pro baskets
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • Moderate tree density

Ørland DiscGolfPark is all about trouble in the woods. While there are some open shots throughout, you’ll find yourself battling with Norway’s native vegetation more often than not. Tunnel shots are common as well, whether it’s the entire fairway or only a portion of one. 

To conquer Ørland with a respectable score, you’ll need to bring your finesse game and only bring out the big guns on rare occasions. I love the Harp and the Justice for courses like these, with a strong anhyzer on some of the softly curving fairways and a Dagger for some of the straight shots. 

Karidalen FrisbeeGolfPark – Lena, Norway

Features

  • 6,100’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • High tree density
  • DISCatcher Pro baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Moderate elevation changes

After a tough one like Ørland, Karidalen will feel like a walk in the park. Though the tree density throughout the course is pretty extensive, the fairway sizes are more than generous. Still, if you slip up really badly on your release, you could end up in an unenviable situation. 

The elevation changes make up the most challenging aspect of this course. Instead of being something just for sightseeing off to the side, the course incorporates elevation well. Some throws are long-distance, with the latter half of the fairway featuring a steep climb. Others are more difficult to discern, with the changes in terrain playing tricks on your judgment. 

Løvbergsmoen Diskgolfpark – Elverum, Norway

Features

  • 11,500’ course length
  • High tree density
  • 18 holes
  • Pro and amateur baskets
  • DISCatcher Pro baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Single pin locations

Finally, we arrive at a generally flat disc golf course. You won’t find much of an elevation challenge at Løvbergsmoen. Instead, you’ll get a brutally long disc golf course with a lot of trees along the way. The tree density and length of the course make it a nasty one for beginners. 

There’s also an elevated basket in case you get too used to the lack of elevation changes. Leave it up to a disc golf designer to create an elevated throw where there was none before! Fortunately, many of the fairways are pretty wide, so you’ll get to challenge your arm with high-speed discs and your finesse at the same time. 

Spangereid FrisbeeGolfBane – Spangereid, Norway

Features

  • 3,700’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • DiscGolfPark Pro baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Moderate tree density

Spangereid is another tough nut to crack, with a solid mix of up-and-down elevation shots and heavy tree density. On some holes, you’ll find yourself up high enough to see the treetops far below. For those new to the game or those who have never experienced playing against elevation, it will be a disconcerting course. 

Fortunately, it’s a beautiful course, with huge boulders jutting out from the grass and tiny pockets of open greenery hidden within the trees. Those rocks will treat your plastic like an archenemy, however, and it will really ruin your day if you hit one and it starts a downhill roll. 

Glåmos DiskGolfBane – Glåmos, Norway

Features

  • 47 holes
  • Rubber tee pads
  • DISCatcher Pro baskets
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • 6,500’ course length
  • Moderate tree density

Glåmos DiskGolfBane wraps things up for us, and it’s yet another solid mix of open, elevated, and forest shots. If you have a big arm, you’ll find something to love as well, with several wide-open shots and others with wide enough fairways to allow for a big release. 

It’s not easy all the way through, however, with several straight lines through the woods and a few doglegs that will toss you a curveball if you’re not paying attention. As usual, the elevation changes are subtle but enough to throw off your game if you’re not ready for them. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Norway

The best disc golf courses in Norway are some of the most beautiful courses in the world. The country is ranked number five for more reasons than just beauty, however. Norway offers some challenging, truly unique course designs that are a lot of fun to try your skills against, and your wits. 

If you’re ever up in Nordic country, Norway is an excellent stop. It may not be the number one country in terms of the sport, but once you step foot onto one of the above courses, you won’t know the difference.

Leave a Comment