Ohio’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Slinging Plastic in The Buckeye State

Choosing the best disc golf courses in Ohio is quite an exercise. The state is loaded with a wide variety of outstanding and unique courses. 

Coming in at number 7, as one of the best states in the US for disc golf, Ohio has 374 courses to sort through, half of which are ranked. 

Ohio is a big state for disc golfers and the sport in general. It’s also a great place for topographical diversity and extreme weather swings. 

In short, Ohio offers a bit of everything, which makes for an excellent disc golf state.

My Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In Ohio

Since I live in Florida, I love traveling to states with some elevation changes and a tree line that has something other than pine, palm, and oak trees in it. 

Everybody gets used to what’s around them, and I’m sure there are plenty of Ohio residents who yawn at hickory and oak trees. 

Ohio has a wealth of topographical opportunities for disc golf course designers, including bedrock hills, a glaciated north, Allegheny Mountain foothills, lakeshores, drainage basins, and steep valleys. 

You don’t have to be a Floridian to appreciate the course design opportunities such a landscape entails. 

  1. Hippo Ridge DGC – Athens (Best Overall)
  2. Johnson Hills DGC – Cincinnati (Best Challenge)
  3. Punderson State Park – Newbury (Runner-Up)

Johnson Hills isn’t one of those top 5 DGC parks on every online list. In fact, you might not know about it unless you’re a local. 

However, I endeavor to call them like I see them, immediately accepting the opinion of UDisc or the Disc golf Scene. Some of them deserve to be there, and some don’t.

The details are below, but suffice it to say, these are the top 3 best disc golf courses in Ohio, in my humble opinion. 

Plus, as with all of my ‘best of’ breakdowns, there are an additional 5 courses on here that deserve to be in the conversation over the best of the best. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses In Ohio

As always, my criterion is fairly simple. I don’t give courses props, regardless of popularity, if they are rife with gimmicky design features, such as a tree in the middle of the fairway ‘just because.’ 

It’s not clever course design, and, in fact, it’s the exact opposite. 

It says to me, “I didn’t know what else to do to make this fairway challenging, so we’re leaving the tree here.”

Most courses have some element of that going on, but I believe it detracts from the playability of a course. 

There’s either a fairway or there isn’t. I also appreciate a healthy use of the terrain in the design without resorting to the aforementioned antics. 

Hippo Ridge DGC – Athens (Best Overall)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 5,500’ to 10,100’ course length
  • Healthy mix of woods and elevation changes
  • Chainstar baskets
  • Private course
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Natural tee pads

Hippo Ridge is hands-down the most popular and prolific disc golf course in the entire Buckeye State. Placing it at the top of my list should convey my agreement. 

This is an outstanding course. It is a bit difficult if you play from the pro tees, but the amateur tees turn it into a much more casual event. 

Unlike many courses out there, this course has a solid mix of par 3s and par 4s, although you’ll only come across a single par 5. 

Hippo Ridge demands accuracy because the rough is punishing, and overgrowth outside the fairway means the difference between making par and pulling a double bogey.

Johnson Hills DGC – Cincinnati (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • Strong elevation changes
  • High tree density
  • Turf tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Mach X baskets

Johnson Hills is a beautiful park, but don’t let that lull you into thinking it’s going to offer an easy ride. 

This is a tough little course, though it does offer players some relief with amateur tees. The toughness is cranked up to the red line once you dive into the back 9, making the front 9 look like a fairly casual ride. 

Tight lines and narrow windows require some finesse on some holes and lasers on others. Putting isn’t too bad, but only if your drive and approach are spot on. If not, prepare yourself for a very lopsided score on the plus side. 

The uphill shots are brutal, especially the ones that require you to push through narrow lines. 

Bring your A-game for this one. 

Punderson State Park – Newbury (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 4,400’ to 8,600’ course length
  • x5 water hazards
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Mach III tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads

The disc golf portion of Punderson State Park is otherwise known as ‘Friends of Punderson DGC,’ as far as the disc golf community is concerned. 

Punderson is a beautiful park and a local favorite for the excellent scenery it offers while you play the game. 

As a state park, it’s fairly large, with the DGC within. 

It’s nowhere near as restrictive as Johnson Hills, with wider fairways that are a little more accommodating to the average player. It’s not a simple course; not by any means. 

However, it won’t turn into a nightmare unless you’re just having a really bad day. 

This course also offers a lot of variety, with three tee pads on each hole, plenty of signage, and a ton of variety.

Findley State Park – Wellington

Features

  • 24 holes
  • 7,100’ to 9,200’ course length
  • x8 water hazards
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Prodigy baskets
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Camping and restrooms on-site or nearby

One of the things I love about disc golf courses in state parks is the number of amenities available. If I’m traveling in my RV and playing a variety of courses, I always make a b-line to the nearest state park with a highly-rated disc golf course. 

Findley State Park is a beautiful setting, and you’ll enjoy the surrounding scenery as much as you will the excellent course design.

There are actually two courses here as well (red and blue). With the addition of the multiple pin locations and pro/amateur pads, you can play this course a hundred different ways without feeling like you just played it. 

Look out for the water hazards, however, though they don’t come into play as often as the above features list implies.

Echo Valley DGC – Springboro

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 7,400’ to 8,900’ course length
  • x7 water hazards
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

Echo Valley is the picturesque hiker’s paradise, with a wealth of evergreen forest to play through, with generous fairways, and a warm-up area to get your arm going before you hit the course itself. 

There’s a healthy mixture of open and wooded shots without too many ‘go-betweens.’

The variety isn’t top-notch. You’ve probably seen this course a thousand times, with the only difference being the topography. 

However, what Echo Valley does do is stick with what works and a course design that winds through some of the prettiest countryside scenery that the state has to offer. 

Eagle Ridge – Coshocton

Features

  • 18 holes
  • x6 water hazards
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Dynamic Veteran baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads

It takes some thought when designing and setting up pro and amateur tee pads. If you’ve been in the game for a while, you’ve probably noticed that, more often than not, there’s little difference between the two outside of distance. 

Eagle Ridge has pro and amateur tees, but Eagle Ridge gets it right. There is an obvious difference between the two, outside the shot being longer on the pro. 

Eagle Ridge is not punishingly difficult; however, the rough is just that—rough. A lack of accuracy is often punishing if you get off the beaten path. 

The mainstay of this course is the elevation changes, which are pretty brutal. Careful disc selection and knowing how to throw them is essential for success at Eagle Ridge. 

Caesar Ford Park Championship – Xenia

Features

  • Two full disc golf courses
  • Championship course – 7,300’ to 10,300’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x6 water hazards
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Camping and restrooms on-site or nearby

There are two courses to play at Caesar Ford Park, but the Championship course is the one I’m focusing on and the better of the two, at least, in my humble opinion. 

Water hazards on this course are frequent enough to be disconcerting, and you’ll always find yourself holding back on the approach only because the creek that winds its way throughout the entire course is right behind the basket. 

This course also offers night play. You can come out and play some glow-in-the-dark disc golf and not have anyone stop and question your presence. 

Overall, the Championship course is challenging but not brutal, and if you get bored, try out the second course, which is a good course in its own right. 

Mt. Airy Forest – Cincinnati

Features

  • 18 holes
  • 6,000’ to 8,600’ course length
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Single tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DGA baskets

Back to Cincinnati for the last of my best disc golf courses in Ohio. Mt. Airy Forest is exactly the kind of course it sounds like when you read it aloud. 

One of the best benefits of the course is the on-site pro store. Missing the perfect disc for a specific fairway challenge? Your answer is right there. 

There are a lot of blind holes, requiring you to pay attention to the signage or walk ahead, along with a ton of uphill shots. High glide discs that don’t drop right out of your hand are helpful, but only if you’re not fighting the wind. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses In Ohio

If you’re looking for the best disc golf courses in Ohio, whether you’re a new player or moving to the state, look no further than the above eight. 

Wholesome of the courses I picked will frustrate beginners to no end, all of them are gimmicky-free and will challenge veterans to newbies. 

On top of that, most offer multiple ways to play the course, while all of them represent the beauty and excellent topography of Ohio. 

Leave a Comment