Pennsylvania’s Best Disc Golf Courses: A-Tier Anhyzers In The Keystone State

As the 11th-ranked state for disc golfers, some of the best disc golf courses in Pennsylvania are also some of the best in the country and the world. Pennsylvania is positively layered in mountains and rolling hills, a natural hotspot for unique and fun course designs. 

From the edges of the Appalachian Mountains to the Delaware River, you’ll find some of the most exciting courses in the Keystone State, eight of which I’ve compiled for your reading and, hopefully, playing pleasure. 

My Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In Pennsylvania

As a Floridian, I am so appreciative of rolling hills and mountains; anything to catch a break from the flatlands. While Florida has some outstanding courses, to be sure, elevation is simply not a thing. You know how it is–everybody gets bored with the same old. 

One thing I love about Pennsylvania disc golf is the variety. While the state is definitely not a flat one, there are areas, such as around the Delaware River, where sea level comes into play. The interesting variety of disc golf courses I’ve put together take full advantage of this wide diversity. 

  1. Faylor Lake Disc Golf Park – Beaver Springs (Best Overall)
  2. The Preserve at AGA Disc Golf Park – Perkasie (Runner-Up)
  3. Codorus State Park – Hanover (Best Challenge)

There are well over 300 courses in the Keystones State, and roughly half of them have 18 holes or more. In fact, the most difficult course on my list, Codoros, has 50+ holes to play, all of which find a way to challenge you in new ways. 

Pennsylvania is a huge state for the game, with sites like the aforementioned Codoros hosting the state championships each year. If you’re as excited about the sport as I am, you’ll love playing in Pennsylvania. It’s a beautiful state, and the course designers who both designed and constructed the courses on my list placed them in some of Pennsylvania’s finest spots. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses In Pennsylvania

Gimmicky, unfair courses, where course design is more of an afterthought in favor of drawing crowds, don’t make my lists. I try to stick with challenging, fair, reputable, and beautiful courses to the best of my ability and experience. 

After all, there’s nothing quite so aggravating as turning your favorite plastic into a taco because of a tree that has no earthly business sitting in the fairway. Sure, there are trees in fairways all the time. If they are splitting lanes or forcing tighter lines, it makes sense. If it’s just there to be there, it rarely does. ‘

With that being said, I try to use the KISS method (keep it simple stupid) as much as possible and compile lists of disc golf courses that you should go out of your way to find, assuming you ever visit some of these states. 

Faylor Lake Disc Golf Park – Beaver Springs (Best Overall)

Features

  • 4,300’ to 10,200’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x6 water hazards
  • DiscGolfPark Pro baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Extreme elevation changes

My number one spot has to go to Faylor Lake Disc Golf Park. It’s one of the most popular DGC areas in the entire state, and for good reason. There’s a practice basket on site in case you need the warm-up before you get started. If you’re afraid of losing your disc in the water, you may want to avoid this course, as a few water carries are necessary. 

Depending on the day and weather, there’s often enough of a breeze to turn your hyzer or anhyzer into a hard-slicing bullet that vanishes into the water. The elevation changes, water hazards, and wind changes are highly challenging, so you’d better bring your A-game and overstable discs if you want to get out of this course with all your plastic still in the bag.

The Preserve at AGA Disc Golf Park – Perkasie (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 8,800’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Single pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • DiscGolfPark Pro baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Pay to play
  • Private course

The Preserve is the exact opposite of Faylor Lake, with the latter being a course of significant elevation changes, while the former is relatively flat. Flat doesn’t make for a dull course that lacks challenges, however. The Preserve is a highly versatile course with an excellent mix of wooded and open tees.

It’s also a very comfortable course, with benches everywhere and exceptional signage to keep you on the right track as you make your way from basket to basket. Tight lines and booming throws are required in order to be successful here. Bagging the majority of your most versatile discs is highly advisable. 

Codorus State Park – Hanover (Best Challenge)

Features

  • Four Courses with over 50 holes
  • Blue Course: 5,600’ to 9,900’ course length
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • Prodigy baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads

As a matter of necessity, I’ll focus on the Blue Course since it’s the most challenging in my estimation. But, if you’re interested, there are three additional courses to play on as well. This course is definitely tough, though it offers some practice shots at a single basket before you dive headlong into the course

This is the type of course that punishes you with merciless enthusiasm if you miss your lane. It’s not that it’s heavily wooded; it’s just that approach shots to recover are often blocked. Disc placement is your most valuable capability out here. Fortunately, the course is well-marked, and though it’s hilly, the elevation changes aren’t punishing

Lakeview DGC At Moraine State Park – West Liberty

Features

  • 6,400’ to 8,900’ course length
  • Somewhat dense with trees and elevation
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Mach X baskets
  • Concrete tee pads

Probably one of the more peaceful and quiet disc golf courses on my list, Lakeview DGC is a pretty course with a variety of ways to play. Thanks to the multiple pin locations and tee pads, you can play the course five times and experience it a different way each time. 

Since the course is set off from everything else in the park, you don’t have to worry about zinging an errant bicycler or jogger in the head. This allows you to put your whole focus on the game and give it your best. The fairways are well-thought-out and will require precision while not quite forcing you to sling laser beams. 

Road Apple DGC – Cambridge Springs

Features

  • 3,700’ to 5,500’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Dense tree cover
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Axiom Pro baskets
  • Dirt tee pads
  • Private course

Road Apple DGC is clearly a private course. However, it’s such a good course that you would be forgiven for thinking that it’s professionally designed. It’s mostly flat, but it makes up for the lack of elevation change with a thickly wooded game. 

With multiple pin locations, you can experience a new challenge each time you play. Tight lines and finesse are always paramount in deeply wooded courses, and that’s true here as well. Fortunately, the undergrowth is well-maintained, so errant throws aren’t punished as brutally. 

Muddy Run DGC – Holtwood

Features

  • 6,500’ to 9,200’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Mach V baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads

This course was a close competitor for the most challenging spot. It’s one of the most straightforward courses I’ve ever put on a list, yet it challenges every aspect of your game beyond a doubt. Muddy Run isn’t unfair; it just isn’t easy to par, much less birdie. 

It’s a versatile course with a strong mix of elevation challenges, short, long, wooded, and open shots. The underbrush isn’t punishing, but the trees flank the fairways well when you’re in the woods, and even the long shots are deceptive. 

Moraine State Park – Portersville

Features

  • 6,400’ to 8,900’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Moderate woods and elevation changes
  • Mach X baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads

Most recreational players ignore Mandos and OB areas throughout the courses they play. And it’s not hard to do so since most courses are not very consistent with marking them. Moraine State Park is definitely consistent, and if you really want to step up your game, play with OB in mind throughout. 

It’s also a peaceful park, separate from non-disc golfers, which always makes for a better game. If you don’t have to worry about other people, enjoying the park’s other offerings, you can more tightly focus on your game. Moraine is a beautiful and moderately challenging park and easily one of the best in the state. 

Deer Lakes Park – Tarentum

Features

  • 5,700’ to 8,300’ course length
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Mach X baskets
  • Concrete tee pads

Last but not least, Deer Lakes Park brings up the back of the line in my list of the best disc golf courses in Pennsylvania. Just because it’s in the back, doesn’t mean you should pass it up, however. Deer Lakes Park is a beautiful park with an excellent course design that challenges and improves your game. 

The signage is exceptional throughout, with a healthy mix of wooded and open shots. Also, like most of the courses on this list, you can play this course in a number of ways each time. Bring your hiking boots. You’ll have to deal with elevation challenges that will affect both your game and your physical endurance. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Pennsylvania

You gotta love the variety of the Pennsylvania landscape, especially as it applies to disc golf. These courses offer a great amount of variety and some of the best challenges the game has to offer.

Newbies shouldn’t be intimidated, either. Even the toughest of courses offer some level of learning value. All in all, the best disc golf courses in Pennsylvania are some of the best in the country, and the world as well.

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