South Carolina’s Best Disc Golf Courses: Mastering the Best In the Palmetto State

In terms of the best disc golf courses in South Carolina, the state stands in the middle of the pack, at 23rd nationally. 

The Palmetto State has over 170 courses, and the northwestern portion of the state has the vast majority of them. 

South Carolina is also a state with a fairly diverse topography, which makes for some exciting and challenging disc golf course designs!

My Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In South Carolina

I have a good deal of personal experience with several of the best disc golf courses in South Carolina. 

Back When I joined the Marines, a lifetime ago, I went through boot camp at Parris Island. 

While I wasn’t exactly playing disc golf at the time, I’m familiar with some of South Carolina’s topography and climate close to the coast. 

While I was in the state (after boot camp, of course), I got an opportunity to play at Earlewood Park Disc Golf Course, one of the oldest, if not the oldest, disc golf courses in South Carolina. 

In those days, I was in prime condition, and remember having a blast. 

Much has changed in the 20+ years since, and other newer courses have risen to the top of the ranks.

  1. Black River DGC – Sumter (Best Overall)
  2. Holston Creek –Inman (Best Challenge)
  3. Langley Pond Disc Golf Park – Langley (Runner-Up)

Holston Creek isn’t in any of the top 5 or top 10 lists, but it’s easily one of the most difficult courses in the state. Black River and Langley are just phenomenal courses altogether, though they face a lot of opposition from Crooked Creek, Grand Central Station, and Splinter City DGC.

Top 8 Best Disc Golf Courses In South Carolina

It’s always tough doing these, especially when I’ve recently played some courses on this list.

Since I have family up in Asheville, North Carolina, and Spartanburg, SC, I get up that way fairly often. 

While I play extensively in Florida, it’s good to get to other states and see the differences in topography. 

Black River DGC – Sumter (Best Overall)

Features

  • 24 holes
  • Moderate tree density
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • Rubber tee pads
  • Private course
  • Catcher X baskets
  • Single pin location
  • Single tee pads

If you enjoy a little peace and quiet to go along with your disc golf play, this course is a must on your list. You have to call ahead and speak to Clayton to get permission to play, along with the address of the course. 

However, he’s a really nice guy, and he keeps his course well-maintained. 

The key to this course being in the number one spot is the variety and challenge. It’s not as tough as some of the other courses on this list, but it features a wide variety of shot types, with elevation changes on every hole. 

Drop zones are vicious, and it’s easy to make a mistake under the many tree canopy ceilings. 

Holston Creek –Inman (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 9,700’ to 10,300’ course length
  • 27 holes
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads
  • x3 water hazards

Holston Creek is one of the toughest courses I’ve ever played. However, what makes it different from other challenging courses is the fairness of it throughout the entire course. There’s not much in the way of gimmicky design features, such as obstacles blocking the entire fairway because of “reasons.” 

There’s also a good variety of open and wooded shots. It’s a good idea to bring the discs you feel will give you a straight line with slight fade, as well as some overstable mid-ranges for tight doglegs. 

The wooded areas are small trees, but they’re often enough to ruin your day. 

Langley Pond Disc Golf Park – Langley (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • x8 water hazards
  • DiscGolfPark Pro baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Moderate elevation changes

Eight water hazards can make for a very bad day. Langley Pond DGP lives up to its namesake, with the pond coming into play on multiple holes. 

Some water carries are necessary, along with a little finesse to keep from overthrowing the basket and ending up in the H2O.

Outside the water hazards, it’s a densely wooded course with tight gameplay throughout. 

Bring your lasers and prepare yourself for a day of plastic tacos as you try to cut the trees down with fairway drivers and mid-ranges. 

This is a good course for some high-glide putters and maybe a Harp or two.

Grand Central Station – Central

Features

  • 6,600’ course length
  • x7 water hazards
  • 18 holes
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Different tee pad types

Grand Central Station is a fantastic course that uses railway terminology to differentiate among the layouts. 

Though there are seven water hazards along the course’s entirety, they are mainly a distant aesthetic, only coming into play if you go way overboard on your shot. 

The mix of wooded and open shots is top-notch, with some holes dipping toes in both. 

The shot variety is exceptional, with tight lines and wide open drives where you can put everything you want to behind the disc and watch it soar. 

You don’t get too many par 5s in disc golf, so it’s always a good challenge to run into a few here and there. 

Sertoma Field – Walhalla

Features

  • 4,200’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x6 water hazards
  • Single tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Gravel tee pads

If you haven’t noticed by now, most of the best disc golf courses in South Carolina have a fairly high number of water hazards throughout. 

Sertoma Field is no exception. Fortunately, it’s a very pretty course, so you’ll enjoy the aesthetic as you’re stretching out to try to get your disc out of the water. 

This is definitely a control course. All of your shots will require good form and release unless you want to go chasing your disc. 

This course is all about the par 3s, doing a lot with very little real estate to work with. 

However, it’s one of the best courses out there to learn and grow your game. 

Crooked Creek Park (Original) – Chapin

Features

  • 3,600’ to 4,800’ course length
  • Two courses
  • x4 water hazards
  • 18 holes
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

One of the things I love about Crooked Creek is the variety of ways you can play what I consider to be a fairly short course. If you’re a southpaw, you’ll love this park. 

If you throw RHBH, you’ll need to learn to put enough torque into your throw to flip the disc or just sidearm everything.

A lot of creativity went into the shots throughout the course, and it’s a challenge for moderately good players to make par or better at each hole. 

While it’s not the biggest course in the state, there are a sprinkling of par 4s in there as well.

Sergeant Jasper Park – Hardeeville

Features

  • 3,800’ to 8,000’ course length
  • 20 holes
  • x13 water hazards
  • High tree density
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • DISCatcher

Otherwise known as “The Sarge,” Sergeant Jasper Park is brutal when it comes to the water. This is the kind of place that is difficult almost purely because a single mistake means your disc is gone for good. 

In the late fall and winter, it may be recoverable. In the summer, however, well, South Carolina does have alligators. 

If you can carve tight lines and elevate your finesse shots at will, you’ll probably be okay. With thirteen water hazards, this course probably has the highest number of any course I’ve reviewed in the past. 

There are a few water carries, but water is mostly a threat to your left and right. 

Winthrop University (Gold) – Rock Hill

Features

  • 9,900’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Moderate tree density
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads

Many college universities across the United States have fully embraced the sport, including Winthrop University in South Carolina. This is a beautiful and well-designed course, good enough to play host to the annual USDGC pro tourney. 

It even includes a massive 1,000’ hole, something you just don’t see very often on courses across the country. 

As a university course, it can get pretty crowded at times, so the presence of other players and people is likely to throw off some of your shots if you go on a busy day. 

It’s a tough course, with a healthy mix of shot types and well-defined OBs. If you play the OBs instead of heading out there for a casual game, the course is even tougher. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in South Carolina

There you have it: the best disc golf courses in South Carolina. Unless you live on the coast, the climate is fairly mild throughout the year, so disc golf tends to be on the to-do list all year long. 

South Carolina is an interesting state. It’s one of those jack of all trades, master of none states for the sport, with a fine mix of topography and course designs. 

I wish that the vast majority of the courses weren’t so clustered in the northwestern portion of the state, but that sometimes happens, especially when there are large towns/cities or popular tourist destinations in the area. 

Overall, I love many of the courses up that way, and will definitely return in the near future.

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