Best Disc Golf Courses In Utah: Incredible Fairways In The Beehive State

Some of the best disc golf courses in Utah are spread out among 130 total throughout the state. 

Utah is running in the middle of the pack in terms of being the best state in the sport. Utah is like many of the Midwestern and Mountain West states: a lot of real estate with a low population.

That’s a good thing, and it also means a bit of peace and quiet to go with the natural beauty the Beehive State has to offer. You’ll find that the best disc golf courses in Utah offer all of the above and then some. 

My Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In Utah

Utah is a beautiful state, and though that certainly enhances any disc golf course, it’s not the end all be all of what makes the best disc golf courses in Utah. 

These courses are challenging and require some finesse, critical thinking, and, in some cases, plenty of exercise. 

I always do my best to put them in their proper order. Unfortunately, some are so close in comparison that I have to judge them on the tiniest of differences. 

  1. Base Camp Adventure – Moab (Best Overall)
  2. Thunderbird Gardens DGC – Cedar City (Best Challenge)
  3. The Fort (Long Version) – Ogden (Runner-Up)

Honestly, it’s a very close call between Base Camp Adventure and The Fort, the latter arguably being one of the best in the world. 

However, as I stated previously, it’s the tiny things that separate them. And, admittedly, some of it’s just plain old preference. 

As far as the most challenging course, Thunderbird Gardens trumps the other two. It’s a brutal elevation battle amongst and against huge, red rocks and boulders. 

In the winter, it’s a slick nightmare where you have to watch your step as much as your technique.

Top 8 Best Disc Golf Courses In Utah

One of the most fascinating aspects of the best disc golf courses in Utah, is the dramatic scenery changes from one course to the next. 

While one is carpeted in lush greenery and towering trees, another is an alien landscape closer to Mars than to anything on Earth. Honestly, “fascinating” is simply too weak a word. 

Base Camp Adventure – Moab (Best Overall)

Features

  • 4,700’ to 6,400’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Different tee pad types
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Pay to play

To be honest, the desert aesthetic was the biggest separating factor for me between Base Camp Adventure and The Fort. 

There just aren’t enough desert disc golf courses, and this one is simply breathtaking. The level of challenge is high, and instead of fighting trees, you’re winding through small red valleys and skimming your plastic off of hard surfaces at high speeds. 

It’s like playing disc golf on Mars, without the thin atmosphere. Red rock formations squeezed together like the stone fists of giants are just incredible. They present the avid disc golfer with as much awe-inspiring, ethereal beauty as they do a challenging, sometimes frustrating play-through.

Thunderbird Gardens DGC – Cedar City (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 4,700’ course length
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Dynamic Veteran baskets
  • Extreme elevation changes

Thunderbird takes that desert vibe from above, combines it with some tree love, and then combines it with extreme elevation changes to make it a massive, hilly challenge. 

The course is short and brutal, especially for the uninitiated. The entire front 9 is an uphill battle, while the back 9 is just outright challenging. A good disc golf backpack will serve as a counterweight while you’re climbing. 

The best part of this course is the design. It’s so well done that the course almost feels as if it naturally formed from the sediment, rose up, and settled in for the long haul. 

No hidden baskets.

No irritating obstacles in the middle of the fairway.

This is as close to a natural disc golf course as it gets, and it presents everything directly to you, daring you to take it on.

The Fort (Long Version) – Ogden (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 18 holes
  • x13 water hazards
  • Heavily wooded
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Prodigy baskets

The Fort would easily be the most challenging course on the list if it weren’t for the amateur tee pad options that simplify things to a degree. 

It’s still a tough nut to crack, with narrow tree tunnels, many water hazards to deal with, and a very versatile mix of fairways.

It’s a championship course, and a single play-through will leave you with little doubt in that regard. The water hazards are brutal from the pro tees but far easier to deal with from the blue tees. 

However, if you feel like you’re up to the challenge, well, it’s your plastic

Jolley’s Ranch – Springville

Features

  • 5,000’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Dynamic Veteran baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads

Playing at Jolley’s Ranch makes it difficult to believe that the red rock desert courses above simply don’t exist in Utah. 

Jolley’s Ranch is an idyllic scene of paradise, a book description loaded with adjectives. It’s a stunningly beautiful course with a horizon layered in mountains. 

It’s not a brutally difficult course either; a perfect choice for beginner disc golf enthusiasts. Jolley’s Ranch is not without its challenges, but the fairways are open and mostly flat. 

Trees are common enough, often serving as borders, flanking the generous fairways throughout. 

Solitude Mountain Resort – Brighton

Features

  • 7,800’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Rubber tee pads
  • Mach III baskets
  • Single tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Seasonal

One of the things that keeps Solitude Mountain Resort from being higher on the list, perhaps as the best challenge, is the fact that it’s seasonal. The course is closed in the winter months, and they don’t even leave the baskets behind. 

When you can play, however, it’s a fun, if excruciatingly challenging course, starting thousands of feet up and working your way up and down throughout. 

The elevation changes are extreme (enough to pop your ears from time to time), and it’s as fun to watch your disc soar as it is challenging to throw skyward and against the mountain. 

Parowan Canyon (North) – Parowan

Features

  • 18 holes
  • DISCatcher and Dynamic Discs baskets
  • A mix of concrete and dirt tee pads
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Water hazards throughout

Parowan Canyon is a challenging disc golf course with tough elevation changes, water hazards, difficult terrain (bring your hiking boots for this one), trees, and some overgrowth in the natural OBs. 

If you’re looking for a shorter challenge, there’s also a south course featuring only 9 holes. Fortunately, the two courses are close together, with the creek winding through both of them. 

It’s one of the more versatile courses on the list, with tight fairways, a couple of par 4s, elevation shots, and water hazards. 

Tetons DGC – West Jordan

Features

  • 2,000’ course length
  • Black Hole Portal baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • 9 holes

I don’t normally include 9-hole courses on my list, with rare exceptions. However, Tetons DGC is a fantastic course for beginners, seeing as many of the best disc golf courses in Utah can be absolutely brutal on new players. 

For a 9-hole option, it’s a fairly popular course as well. You’ll especially love the tee signs, which are all richly detailed and full of information. 

If you walk the wrong way or throw the wrong direction, it’s because you aren’t paying attention. Overall, this is a fantastic course to get your feet wet for the first time. 

Kanab DGC – Kanab

Features

  • 5,900’ to 6,200’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Single tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Prodigy baskets
  • Seasonal
  • x1 water hazard

As with Solitude Mountain, Kanab closes shop throughout the winter months, so you have to get all your disc golf gaming in throughout the warmer months. 

However, it’s worth the wait, as the scenery is fantastic, and the course is well taken care of. 

There’s a reservoir nearby as well, but it only comes into play a couple of times as you make your way through the course. And you’ll have to be way off to send your disc into a nose dive in the H2O. 

Fortunately, the water is beautiful and clear, so if you have to go collect your disc and it’s plenty warm enough, feel free to dive in. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Utah

The best disc golf courses in Utah are probably more numerous than my little list of eight indicates. 

In fact, I tend to think the state is more deserving of a ranking higher than its current 29th place. 

It’s a beautiful state with a diverse and rich landscape perfectly suited for disc golf

Whether you’re in a red desert, surrounded by craggy rocks and short bluffs, or in a green, lush landscape, surrounded by mountains, it’s easy to fall in love with the sport. 

The Beehive State has a lot to offer newcomers and veteran disc golfers alike, and it’s more than worth the trip!

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