Best Disc Golf Courses In Virginia: Elite Fairways In Old Dominion

The best disc golf courses in Virginia are historic, mostly because there is not a single square inch of Virginia soil that doesn’t hold some sort of historical relevance. 

I lived in Fredericksburg for five years, Quantico for three, and Stafford for two more.

In all my nine years as a Virginia resident, I discovered two things: Virginia is probably the state with the richest American history, and it’s a heck of a place to play disc golf! You’re about to find out why.

My Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In Virginia

Virginia is a beautiful slice of real estate, and I used to spend a lot of time hiking, hunting, and disc golfing in some of the wildest, out-of-the-way places throughout the state. 

I especially liked sticking close to the Potomac. 

The best disc golf courses in Virginia make good use of Virginia’s topography without minimizing it in any way. 

You have to look far and wide to find a DGC in the state that has lower than a four-star rating. 

  1. New London Tech DGC — Forest (Best Overall)
  2. Cannon Ridge — Fredericksburg (Runner-Up)
  3. Pohick Bay Regional Park — Lorton (Best Challenge)

Of course, I had to choose one from the place I lived. However, it’s not necessarily a matter of bias. 

Cannon Ridge is easily one of the highest-rated courses in the state.

 Pohick Bay is a tight and brutal course, while New London offers a bit of something for everyone. 

Fortunately, the list doesn’t begin and end with just three. I’ll include five more, and honestly, I could probably go on and on. 

There are simply a ton of top-tier courses in a state ranked 17th. As it happens, Virginia is also a state with many of the longest courses in the game.

If you appreciate bombing runs with ultra-high-speed drivers, this is the state for you. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses In Virginia

After waxing poetic about the beauty and wonder of the disc golf courses in the Commonwealth, here we are—the eight best disc golf courses in Virginia. Enjoy. 

New London Tech DGC — Forest (Best Overall)

Features

  • 11,600’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • Average tree density
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Chainstar Pro baskets
  • Turf tee pads

New London Tech DGC carries the “championship level” moniker and is a heck of a challenge. 

In fact, I could very easily have placed this one in the Best Challenge category. It’s a very long course, so prepare yourself for a minimum of a couple of hours. 

You’ll have an opportunity to use just about everything in your disc golf cart, including your high-speed drivers, despite the trees. 

There’s a good deal of variety here, including precision shots into and out of tree tunnels, relatively open, long pars, and tight throws on approaches where mid-ranges of every variety shine. 

Cannon Ridge — Fredericksburg (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 5,500’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Moderate elevation changes
  • Average tree density
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads

For such a surprisingly short course (Virginia is known for its long courses), Cannon Ridge demands a mixed disc golf bag. You’ll spend a good amount of time throwing uphill and back downhill. There are some flat, narrow shots through tree tunnels, and, to be honest, these are the ones that hammered me the most.

I tend to pack a lot of overstable mid-ranges, but even my scant few stable mids struggled to get out of these throws. 

You’ll need enough finesse to coax a slight s-curve out of your discs to survive these deadly tunnels and avoid the tree line.

Pohick Bay Regional Park — Lorton (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 3,300’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Dense tree coverage
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Single tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations

The Pohick Bay course is one of the most brutal I’ve ever played. It’s a very short course, but you won’t thank the course designers for that. 

In fact, you’ll probably be grateful when it’s over. 

This is the course where I cracked my brand-new Halo Gold Line, which was also my daughter’s favorite disc.

Finesse and lighting bolts are what’s required here. Impeccable release, form, and patience help as well. 

On the bright side, there are a lot of other park amenities going on to help shake off the fury of a bad finish. Approach this one with caution and care. 

Lake Marshall (The Lions) — Montross

Features

  • 10,400’ to 12,100’ course length
  • x9 water hazards
  • 18 holes
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Prodigy baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Pay to play

You read that right—nine water hazards throughout this course, so you may want to bring some snorkeling gear. 

Fortunately, the water hazards aren’t gimmicky. In fact, there is no such thing as gimmicky on this course. Out of all the courses out there that are “hard but fair,” Lake Marshall meets the definition the best. 

Prepare to be challenged to a higher disc golfing standard, but you won’t feel like it’s a feature of the course if you fail. 

There’s an excellent mix of shots out here, as well, including looping elevation throws, tight lines, huge s-curves, and more finesse. This course does an exceptional job of mixing it all up. 

Mayflower Hills — Roanoke

Features

  • 18 holes
  • x4 water hazards
  • 18 holes (2 or 3 baskets each)
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Pay to play
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

I love a course that you can play in a number of ways, and with permanent pins in place on every hole, Mayflower Hills fits the bill. 

Depending on which hole you’re on, there may be more than two pins. You can play the course multiple times and never come away with matching experiences. 

There are plenty of throws where you have to fight the elevations, along with wide-open shots and a few narrow tree tunnels as well. 

A couple of shots require you to tee off sideways, as the land slopes from right to left or vice versa. It’s a funny feeling as you release. Be sure to keep a good mix in your bag. 

Raptor’s Roost (Wing Course) — Gordonsville

Features

  • 5,200’ to 11,800’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Prodigy baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • x2 water hazards
  • Pay to play

Raptor’s Roost (Wing) is one of four courses, including Little Wing, Talon, and Woods Par 2. In fact, the Wing course is a part of the Little Wing course, so you may run into players coming up on one course while you’re working your way through this one. 

Fortunately, it’s rarely a problem. 

There are a lot of massive fairways here, and even the ones that are flanked by trees are still very wide. 

This is the perfect course for bringing your fastest discs and some overstable midranges for those tweener throws that are not quite far enough for a high-speed disc. 

Sugar Hollow — Bristol

Features

  • 6,500’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • A lone water carry
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Average tree density
  • Moderate elevation changes

Sugar Hollow is a fun course, and not as long as some of the more epic variations of the best disc golf courses in Virginia. 

There’s a good mix of shot types throughout, including some big bombers if you really want to work your arm out. Finesse is required periodically, and precision from time to time as well. 

Tunnel shots are the bane of my existence, and you’ll find that here, too. 

Overall, the course has a lot to offer players at all skill levels. Beginners may struggle at first, but this is just the type of course that will improve your game without burying you in your own despair. 

Independence Park — Bedford

Features

  • 6,400’ to 7,500’ course length
  • x6 water hazards
  • 18 holes
  • Dynamic Veteran baskets
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Mixed tee pad types
  • Heavy tree density
  • Extreme elevation changes

Independence Park is a challenging disc golf course. It’s not quite as difficult as the Best Challenge spot, but it’s close. There are tunnel shots, shots over fences, out of the trees, and into open space, and vice versa. 

Honestly, there’s a solid variety here, but the topography use makes them all a challenge.

You’ll catch some relief here and there, but some of the shots will make you wish you weren’t right-handed, and others will make you wish the opposite. 

The most successful players have a sidearm that matches their backhand

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Virginia 

The best disc golf courses in Virginia are more than just a list. I’m actually surprised that the state is only 17th because playing several courses there always gave me the impression that it’s easily a top-10 state. 

Regardless, if you’re looking for some of the best variety the sport has to offer, Virginia has it. The fact that it’s one of the prettiest states in the country certainly helps. 

If you’re heading up to the Commonwealth, don’t forget your discs, and prepare for both a challenge and a lot of fun. 

Leave a Comment