Best Disc Golf Courses In Washington: Ace Runs and Birdy Shots In The Evergreen State

My choice of best disc golf courses in Washington came from a pool of 63 ranked courses throughout the state. 

With a 22 ranking, Washington is in the middle of the pack in terms of the best states for disc golf. But I’ve worked with a lot less in the past and still found some true gems. 

Washington is a beautiful state to boot, so many of the courses on this list are every bit as advertised, along with some incredible scenery that just adds to the overall fun and competitive adventure. 

My Top Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In Washington

Washington is far enough north to make disc golf more of a seasonal sport, though you can still play some courses in the winter. 

It’s also a state with a ton of variety in terms of the topography. Disc golf is an incredibly fun sport, and it thrives even more when course designers have a lot to work with. 

Mountainous terrain, deep valleys, open and rolling hills, and deep, evergreen forests abound throughout the state. 

As always, I choose my courses based on the best design features, lacking gimmicky obstacles, and with a focus on challenging and rewarding play. 

  1. Kayak Point DGR Red Course – Warm Beach (Best Overall)
  2. Shelton Springs DGC – Shelton (Best Challenge)
  3. Rainshadow DGP – Sequim (Runner-Up)

All three of these courses offer disc golfers, beginners, and veterans alike unique challenges and plenty of variety. 

Kayak Point is one of four courses in the same park, while Shelton Springs presents a furious challenge, though you can take it easier on amateur tees. 

It’s hard to beat versatility in this sport, especially if you live close to a disc golf course. If that course becomes your mainstay, variety makes a huge difference in keeping things fresh and elevating your game. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses In Washington

Now that you know what you’re in for, I won’t stop at just three courses. I always stick to eight because I figure it’s a well-rounded number. 

With that being said, here are my best disc golf courses in Washington, starting from the top.

Kayak Point DGR Red Course – Warm Beach (Best Overall)

Features

  • 8,100’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Mach VII baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Pay to play

Kayak Point Red is one of the most popular disc golf courses in the state. Better yet, if you get bored playing on Red, there are three more courses to choose from, which include the Original Course (Blue), Gold, and the Pitch and Putt Course. 

Red takes advantage of the elevation changes with plenty of up-and-down shots. 

There’s a pro shop on site as well, so you can make up for lost discs or shop for something that’s currently missing in your bag or disc golf cart

With the number of courses out here, you’re bound to figure out what discs you need to get your hands on and the ones that have the least use in your bag. 

Shelton Springs DGC – Shelton (Best Challenge)

Features

  • 5,900’ to 8,400’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • High tree density
  • Chainstar Pro baskets
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Single pin locations
  • Pro and amateur baskets

Ultra high-speed drivers are your best friends at Shelton Springs DGC, with 6 par 4s and a par 5 to challenge your arm. The hard-flinging fun doesn’t end there either, as many of the fairways are fairly open and forgiving, allowing you room to drive those mid-ranges and fairway drivers with power. 

There’s not much in the way of elevation changes, but you will have to deal with a high tree density throughout the course. That’s what makes this course so challenging—the amount of adjustment you have to make from hole to hole. Variety is both its strongest and cruelest aspect. 

Rainshadow DGP – Sequim (Runner-Up)

  • 4,800’ to 5,000’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads

My runner-up for the best disc golf courses in Washington is Rainshadow DGP, which is an awesome name in its own right. Like Shelton Springs, there is a good deal of variety here, with multiple par 4s, short throws, major uphill and downhill shots, heavy trees, and wide-open challenges. 

Fortunately, the park is very well kept, and you don’t have to worry about the rough being too vicious. Load your disc golf bag up with a healthy mix of disc types because the odds are good that you’ll need all of them at some point. 

This park also features something I love: nine-hole loops, bringing you back to the parking lot before the back nine. 

Lucky Mud Raven DGC –Skamokawa

Features

  • 5,700’ course length
  • 21 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • A mixture of tee pad types
  • A mixture of basket types
  • Pay to play

Another great course with a fantastic mix of different shot types throughout. Again, bring a mixed bag of disc golf discs for this course and expect a challenge. The good news is that you have a lot of options for every hole, with multiple pin locations and multiple tee pads. 

You can play several different ways each time, which is one of my favorite course types. If I can play a course four or five times and come out with a different experience each time, I’m happy. The only drawback to this course is disc recovery. The rough is bad enough that it’ll hide your disc from you if you’re off on a throw. 

Roche Harbor – Friday Harbor

Features

  • 4,400’ to 6,800’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Single tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Rubber tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

Though there is only one tee pad on each hole, Roche Harbor features three pins per, which adds that layer of variety I really appreciate. Also, like most of the courses on this list, there is a good variety of shot types throughout. 

The short throws will allow you to learn how to drive a putter or gain better control over your mid-range. 

It’s a relatively short course, especially if you play all the close pins. If you have plenty of time, you can easily run through this course twice and feel like you played two different courses. 

It’s a mostly flat course, though there is a single uphill shot where you’ll need some extra glide and a little luck to keep that disc airborne. 

Mossy Roc – Bellingham

Features

  • Extreme elevation changes
  • High tree density
  • 18 holes
  • Pay to play
  • Multiple tee pad types
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Private course

Mossy Roc is a tough little course, and it requires plenty of finesse. As with most courses that have a ton of trees and short throws, your approach game is immensely valuable. Your best mid-ranges and a few fairway drivers are your go-to discs with your more comfortable and dependable putters

It’s a highly technical course, and it’s worth taking a step back at each tee pad and giving yourself time to scan the fairway and choose the right disc for the job. Errors on a course like this will rack up those bogies pretty fast. 

Gaffney’s Grove – Maple Valley

Features

  • 4,000’ to 4,100’ course length
  • High tree density
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Mach V baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads

Gaffney’s Grove is a beautiful, heavily wooded course with broad fairways that aren’t too brutal, even on those disc golfers with the least experience. It’s especially fun to play in the summer, surrounded by towering trees and comfortably in the shade. 

Overstable mid ranges rule the roost here, though you’ll need some discs with a more stable fade so they don’t end up chopping in too early or rolling half a mile once they hit the ground. Lots of trees mean lots of surface roots, which will ruin your day if you hit one at the right angle. 

Camp Sekani Jamboree – Spokane

Features

  • 5,800’ to 6,900’ course length
  • 20 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Mixed basket types
  • Concrete tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Pro and amateur tee pads

This is the king of elevation courses, with a ton of uphill and downhill battles for you and your plastic armament to fight your way through. It’s not thick on the tree side of things, but there are certainly enough of them out there to ruin your day on an errant throw. 

It’s a good course to bring a variety of plastics in terms of glide numbers. You’ll need low-glide lasers and high-glide floaters, but not much in between. Don’t forget your high-speed drivers since there are a few long shots on this course as well. 

Overall, an excellent mix, with elevation changing the entire dynamic. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses in Washington

Above, we covered the best disc golf courses in Washington. The state may carry a 22nd ranking out of the bunch, but it still offers a phenomenal amount of variety and premium disc golf course offerings. 

It’s also a beautiful state, so you get the best of both worlds, both in terms of sightseeing and the challenge of the disc golf courses on offer. If you’re looking for fantastic disc golf options in the Evergreen State, the eight courses on this list need to make their way onto yours. 

Let us know in the comments if you think we overlooked one of the best disc golf courses in Washington!

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