Best Disc Golf Courses In West Virginia: Up Your Elevation Game In The Mountain State

The best disc golf courses in West Virginia are tailored to fit the elevation game. That’s right, they don’t call it the Mountain States for no reason at all. 

That’s not to say there aren’t any flat courses in the state. But, most of the best the state has to offer includes elevation changes to one degree or another. 

So, if you’re in the neighborhood and need to work on your elevation game, West Virginia is an exceptional place, and it keeps the challenges coming. 

My Top Picks For The Best Disc Golf Courses In West Virginia

For starters, West Virginia is called the Mountain State because, you guessed it, the Appalachians run right through it. 

However, it’s certainly not the only state with mountains. Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and even Alabama have mountains, to one degree or another, as well as some states to the west. 

The point is the state is a vertical challenge, without a doubt, and some of the courses I chose to put on this list take full advantage of that fact. 

They’re excellent courses because of the innovative design that went into them, utilizing the elevation changes as an obstacle, not a gimmicky measure.

  1. Nellie’s – Renick (Best Overall) 
  2. Lake Stephens – Surveyor (Runner-Up)
  3. Orange Crush – Fairmont (Best Challenge)

Keep in mind, before I dive into the meat and potatoes of the list, that the third-place spot isn’t necessarily third-place. I like to include a brutal challenge when I find one, and it always makes a spot below number one. 

Orange Crush is one of the most brutal and unmerciful courses I’ve ever encountered, and the feeling is mutual with many a good player. It more than deserves the spot. 

Top 8: Best Disc Golf Courses In West Virginia

Well, here we are—the best disc golf courses in West Virginia. The Mountain State sits in the 33rd spot in terms of the best states for the game. 

However, I find that it’s often irrelevant where a state is placed. Does it have fun courses that challenge new and veteran players alike? Absolutely.

With that being said, that’s all I need from a state, regardless of where it may sit on a highly opinionated ranking chart. Knowing that, let’s dive into the best the state has to offer. 

Nellie’s – Renick (Best Overall)

Features

  • 5,000’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • A mix of tee pad types
  • A mix of basket types
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • Private course

Nellie’s is a name that sounds so fitting for the state. It conjures images of some log cabin out in the middle of no-man’s land, probably on the side of a mountain. That’s exactly what you get with this course, except for the log cabin. I love the elevation changes here, and they are often extreme. 

In fact, the course designers had to put stepping stones in just so you can get up the next hill without rolling back down to the bottom. 

I always prefer my high-glide discs on courses like these, even though wind makes that choice problematic at times. Throwing downhill is the opposite, so stick with discs you can throw like laser beams with as low a fade number as possible. 

Lake Stephens – Surveyor (Runner-Up)

Features

  • 5,700’ to 6,600’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • x3 water hazards
  • High tree density
  • Prodigy baskets
  • Turf tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Single tee pads

Lake Stephens is a relatively new course that has a lot of players very excited. Don’t let the “high tree density” description scare you away, even if you’re new to the game. 

The fairways within the woods are pretty wide and far more forgiving than many heavily wooded courses. 

The best thing Lake Stephens has to offer is the variety. You’ll need a divers bag to tackle the hard doglegs, distance shots, technical shots, and uphill/downhill game. 

The trees are excellent wind buffers, so your high glide numbers and understandable discs won’t suffer too much. The water comes into play a few times, and it’s enough to swallow your discs. 

Orange Crush – Fairmont (Best Challenge)

Features 

  • 4,300’ to 7,000’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • High tree density
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Turf tee pads

If you want one of the truest challenges of your disc golfing history, Orange Crush should be high on your list. The biggest factor it has going for it, and one that I highly appreciate and respect, is that it’s hard without being gimmicky. 

The course is well-designed, and failing the challenge is always due to your game, not some ridiculous feature on the course. 

One reason beginners can tackle this course is the amateur baskets and multiple pin locations. They provide some relief for those who just aren’t up to the challenge of the pro tees and difficult pin positions. 

Tight lines and accurate releases are key. With the heavy woods element, try to stick with understable discs without a brutal fade. 

Greenbrier State Forest – Caldwell

Features

  • 5,400’ course length
  • Hilly
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Single pin locations
  • Single tee pads
  • A single water hazard

I figured it was best to follow up one of the most difficult courses with something a little easier, especially for beginners just getting into the game. However, Greenbrier State Park isn’t a pushover. 

It’s a beautiful course, with rolling hills to deal with rather than extreme elevation changes throughout.

A good mix of up and downhill shots will improve your elevation game for the more mountainous courses. Also, though I would consider this to be a medium course, in terms of length, it’s almost entirely par 3s. 

Valley Park – Hurricane

Features

  • 4,500’ to 6,200’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • x3 water hazards
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Single pin location
  • Turf tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

Shaping your shots is an art form, and Valley Park demands it. Not because it’s so full of trees that perfection is the only successful way to compete. 

It’s actually what I would consider to be moderate with the tree density. However, the fairways are designed using the trees to force you to carefully consider your throw and work on your release. 

It’s not the same as obstacles for the sake of it. The course is more than fair, so long as you are on top of your game. It’s also situated in a beautiful little park within city limits that includes a fair variety of short and long throws

Redeemer Yellow – Charleston

Features

  • 6,500’ to 7,800’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • DISCatcher baskets
  • Concrete tee pads

As with all of the courses on this list that come with extreme elevation changes, disc selection, and approach angles are king. There’s a solid variety of open and wooded shots throughout, with long and short holes as well. 

Your greatest enemy on this course is the elevation, whether you are throwing uphill or trying to max out your distance on a downhill shot without overshooting your basket by a mile. 

Wind can also play a big factor here, so the extremes of overstable and understable discs are necessary in your bag. 

Seth Burton Memorial DGC – Fairmont

Features

  • 4,900’ to 7,700’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Pro and amateur tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Concrete tee pads
  • DISCatcher baskets

Seth Burton Memorial DGC offers a difficult or amateur experience, depending on the tees and pins you aim to stick with. It’s also one of those rare courses that accomplishes a mix of short, long, dogleg, and straight fairways. 

As per usual, at a West Virginia disc golf course, elevation changes are a major factor throughout, regardless of the fairway layout. 

While your drive is important, the approach, along with the approach you’re faced with after your initial drive, is the most important aspect of your game. 

The Woodshed – Paw Paw

Features

  • 7,700’ course length
  • 18 holes
  • Extreme elevation changes
  • Turf tee pads
  • Multiple pin locations
  • Mach III baskets
  • Single tee pads
  • Private course
  • Pay to play

The Woodshed is one of those courses that has obtained legendary status. Players who are thoroughly engrossed in the game and live somewhere along the northeastern states have probably heard of this course. 

It’s not a flashy course but a beautiful and challenging course featuring a fantastic design.

You’ll find wide open and heavily wooded holes here and the expected extreme elevation changes across the entire course. 

This is one of those courses where you will serve yourself well by packing your disc golf bag with a wide variety of discs. You’ll need every one of them. 

Final Putt: Best Disc Golf Courses In West Virginia

The best disc golf courses in West Virginia are almost entirely designed against a field of heavy elevation change. It’s not the Mountain State for no reason, after all. 

Fortunately, that makes for a fun change for disc golfers like me, coming from a flat, southern state.

If your up-and-down game needs improvement, or you’re just looking for a different kind of challenge, West Virginia has it all. Not every course in the state is you versus the mountain, either. 

There’s plenty of variety to be had, and, of course, you have to stop by Paw Paw and hit up the Woodshed while you’re in the state.

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